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I have cloned repository and have made some commits:

git clone ...
git add
git commit
git add
git commit
git add 
git commit 

Now I have realized that it will be better to move all my commits to another new branch. What is the best way to do it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

easy, check out your new branch, then move the old branch (let's assume master and 3 commits were made) back:

git checkout -b my_new_branch
git branch -f master HEAD~3
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Neat. I think you may need a -f, though: git branch -f master HEAD~3 –  Rob Davis Jun 18 '11 at 18:28
    
@rob: yup, i forgot to put -f there –  knittl Jun 18 '11 at 18:31
    
How do you do this if you have already pushed back? –  Brett Ryan Mar 6 '13 at 12:59
    
@BrettRyan: Well, you'd have to force the push – but this will alter history. Everyone who has pulled from or cloned your repository will get confused. Only do it, if you really have to. –  knittl Mar 6 '13 at 18:52
    
@knittl all I want to do is undo 3 commits for example, they can stay in history and just have all changes undone and committed as a new commit, the commit message should state what caused the undo. –  Brett Ryan Mar 7 '13 at 0:57

knittl's answer works, but there are other ways to do this.

I'm assuming you're on the master when you first cloned this repository the master branch will match the master branch on the repository you've cloned from. This is origin/master. Since your question starts with a clone this is a fair assumption.

So, after you've made your commits on the master branch, you are now ahead of the origin/master branch.

The first thing you do is create a new branch

git branch new_branch

Note: this command just creates a new branch but doesn't switch branches. So master and new_branch now point to the same commit, but you are still on the master branch.

Next thing to do is to set the current branch (which is master) to the state it was before you added commits. This is the same state as origin/master so you issue this command

git reset --hard origin/master

This sets the current branch to the same state as origin/master. The --hard sets the index and the working tree to the initial state. There are other flags, but they don't do what you want here. (Attention: If you had uncommitted changes in your working tree, they are now thrown away. Use git stash in this case before the reset.)

So now you're on master which points the same state as origin/master, all you need to do is switch to the new branch:

git checkout new_branch

Yes, this is a bit longer (3 commands instead of 2), but you don't have to count how many commits you've got to go back, and this will work even if you've branched, merged, and rebased; and I get to explain other ways of doing things in Git.

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reset --hard will remove all changes from the working tree. you mention »sets index and working tree to initial state«, but i don't think this warning is clear enough for git newcomers. using git branch also works after merging, rebasing and other stuff. you can use git branch -f master origin/master to re-create the master branch at the origin/master commit (or any other place) –  knittl Jun 18 '11 at 18:55
    
@knittl - Actually, no, because you've already got the changes in the new_branch. It will reset the working tree for master, but you then checkout new_branch. –  Abizern Jun 18 '11 at 18:58
2  
You can use origin/master instead of HEAD~3 in knittl's version, too. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 18 '11 at 19:08
1  
@Abizern: The problem (which knittl is pointing out) is that any uncommitted changes in the working tree are lost by the reset --hard (a plain checkout would complain here). This can be avoided by git stash before, or using knittl's version, which does not affect the working tree at all. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 18 '11 at 19:12
1  
i did not say your answer was wrong, i said it was lacking a warning about losing uncommitted changes. your comment about different worktrees for different branches was wrong though. add+commit does not mean that every change was committed … –  knittl Jun 18 '11 at 19:34

Create a new branch, then reset the head to origin/master

git branch new_branch
git reset --hard origin/master

Attention: This last command will discard anything which you have in your working copy and not yet committed. Use git stash before if there is anything you want to preserve.

Then checkout your new branch

git checkout new_branch
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reset --hard will remove all changes from the working tree! bad, bad advice without any hint of a warning –  knittl Jun 18 '11 at 18:54
    
@knittl - Actually, no, because you've already got the changes in the new_branch. It will reset the working tree for master, but you then checkout new_branch. –  Abizern Jun 18 '11 at 18:58
    
@abizem: see my answer to your comment on your answer –  knittl Jun 18 '11 at 19:02
    
@knittl: I added a warning here. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 18 '11 at 19:07

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