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Is it somehow possible to pass an std::unique_ptr as a parameter to a boost::thread constructor? If not, what is the best workaround?

A small example:

// errors: g++ uniqueptr_thread.cpp -std=c++0x

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

class TestThread{
public:
  void operator()(std::unique_ptr<int> val){
    std::cout << "parameter: " << val << std::endl;
  }

};

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){

  std::unique_ptr<int> ptr(new int(5));

  boost::thread th( new TestThread(), std::move(ptr));

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This compiles and runs for me:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <thread>

class TestThread{
public:
  void operator()(std::unique_ptr<int> val){
    std::cout << "parameter: " << *val << std::endl;
  }
};

int main()
{

  std::unique_ptr<int> ptr(new int(5));

  std::thread th( TestThread(), std::move(ptr));
  th.join();

}

But it has to be in C++0x mode. I don't know if the boost move emulation is good enough to do this or not.

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with which compiler? g++ 4.4.5 gives me longer error list than the boost version, using the same options (-std=c++0x) –  Dutow Jun 18 '11 at 19:56
    
@Dutwo: According to C++0x, it should work. If it doesn't, then it's probably something wrong with your version of GCC or libc++. Perhaps try a more recent one? –  Nicol Bolas Jun 18 '11 at 19:57
    
I used clang + libc++ (llvm.org), pretty close to tip-of-development trunk for both of them, on Mac OS X. –  Howard Hinnant Jun 18 '11 at 21:21
1  
This does not compile in GCC4.6 either. My naive guess at the moment is that it is because std::bind removes references, and that there is no rvalue-reference wrapper. Indeed, using the make_adv construction from this SO question I can make it compile, but I get a system_error exception at runtime. –  Kerrek SB Jun 19 '11 at 16:45
    
fails to build in VS2013 –  paulm Oct 29 at 10:54

A std::unique_ptr is, as the name suggests, unique. There can be only one!

Now, if your thread function takes a std::unique_ptr&&, and you use std::move to move the parameter in the thread function, then you can pass the std::unique_ptr. But then your copy will be empty, since you moved it to the other thread.

If std::move does not work, then your compiler or standard library may have bugs in it. I imagine that transferring ownership across threads like this isn't a common occurrence. And C++11 is still fairly new.

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1  
+1. I suspect moving it to the other thread is what he wanted. This looks like a clean way to pass an arbitrary object to a thread. –  Nemo Jun 18 '11 at 19:43
    
sorry, I forgot std::move from the example code, it was there in the original, but it still won't compile –  Dutow Jun 18 '11 at 19:45

Are you sure your problem is with the unique_ptr? Why does your example use new to create your functor? That line should just read:

boost::thread th(TestThread(), std::move(ptr));
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