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I know there are a few topics about this, but I still would like to hear your opinion. I'm creating a website that is going to send some messages around the network. Those messages will be encrypted by a private/public-key encryption.

Now, since my server is going to send a lot of those messages, I'm going to need access to the private key a lot. This private key is currently located on the server as a file. However this is not something that is required.

Now, if no-one is able to enter my server, there is no problem at all. But what if someone gets access to my server? They can just take the private key file and my security is breached.

I'm not able to use a hardware solution for this problem.

What are my options?

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You understand that your private key is only used for 1) Signing messages you create and 2) Decrypting messages sent to you by others. If you are sending a message to person or node X you use X's public key to secure the message. –  GregS Jun 18 '11 at 20:03
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If someone has access to your server they can just rewrite your app to send stuff off-site. Secure your server and keep the key on the server. –  tjameson Jun 18 '11 at 20:05
    
This problem is faced by every SSL server on the internet. The only option is to secure your webserver as best you can and when you detect server compromise you revoke your key. This is most easily done by using X509 certificates issued by someone like Verisign, GoDaddy, GlobalSign, Comodo, etc. –  GregS Jun 18 '11 at 20:05
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If they have the key, and they know what to do with it (where & how it applies to your messages), then yes, you're completely compromised. But, let's face it, that's always the case when someone has rooted your server.

A better approach might be: How can I prevent common hacks, like a man-in-the-middle attack, from compromising security?

I would say:

  1. Transmit the messages over SSL (If you're using HTTP/HTTPS protocol).
  2. Obfuscate the code that provides the encode/decoding functionality. This will make your hash harder to decode if someone does get the key. If you're not encoding the key and/or message on the server, and decoding on the client - that may be something to look into depending on your requirments
  3. On the network the messages are being transmitted, use a network tool to monitor traffic (i.e. snort). Intrusion detection could tell you when someone is up to something.

Just a start...

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Now, since my server is going to send a lot of those messages....

If you really only need to send messages to other participants, you only need their public key stored on your server. No danger there.

If you intend to sign / decrypt messages sent to you however you must think about a secure private key storage solution.

Now, if no-one is able to enter my server, there is no problem at all. But what if someone gets access to my server? They can just take the private key file and my security is breached.

You will always have one single point of failure, one piece of code that has to know your private key / the secret to access the private key, etc. But this problem does not come from public / private key encryption but rather the system itself. At one point you always have to process the unencrypted message regardless of the underlying protocol.

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Sorry I was indeed very unclear in my start post. I was actually looking for a secure private key storage solution. –  Timo Willemsen Jun 18 '11 at 20:10
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