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This is my first foray in either SQL CE or EF, so I may have a lot of misunderstandings. I've searched a lot of blog entries but still can't seem to get this right.

I have an MVC3 web site for registrations for a race we're running. I have a RaceEvents table, and a Runners table, where each RaceEvent will have many runners registered it for it, i.e., Many-to-One. Here are the POCO's with extraneous data stripped out:

  public class RaceEvent
{
    [Required]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Runner> Runners { get; set; }

}

    public class Runner
{
    [Required]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public int RaceEventId { get; set;}
    [ForeignKey("RaceEventId")]
    public RaceEvent RaceEvent { get; set; }
}

Which, as much as I can figure out, ought to work. As I understand it, it should figure out by convention that RaceEventId is a foreign key to RaceEvents. And if that's not good enough, I'm telling it with the ForeignKey attribute.

However, it doesn't seem to be working. Whenever I insert a new runner, it is also inserting a new entry in the RaceEvents table. And when I look at the table diagram in ServerExplorer, it shows two gold keys at the top of the Runners table diagram, one for Id, identified in the properties as a PrimaryKey, and the other for RaceEventId, not identified as a PrimaryKey, but indicated in the properties to be for table Runners, rather than for table RaceEvents. I would expect a gold key for Id, but a silver ForeignKey for RaceEventId.

FWIW, I don't really care about the ICollection in the RaceEvent, but the blog entries all seemed to imply that it was necessary.

Can anybody help me get this right?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Just to clear things up a bit, apparently the structure of the Primary and Foreign Keys in the generated table is correct, but Server Explorer isn't displaying it correctly. When I download ErikEJ's terrific SQL Server Compact Toolbox, it correctly displays the structure of the table with a Primary Key for Runner.Id and a Foreign Key for Runner.RaceEventId. – Dave Hanna Jul 10 '11 at 23:20
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok,

Sorry I did not read your question in enough detail. In our project this is how we would represent what your doing. I looked in SSMS and it is not showing said grey key, but it does not create a race event every time you add a runner. Although you do need to make sure when you create a runner that you set the race event property.

public class DB : DbContext
{
    public DB()
        : base("Data Source=(local);Initial Catalog=DB;Integrated Security=True")
    {
    }

    public IDbSet<Runner> Runners { get; set; }
    public IDbSet<RaceEvent> RaceEvents { get; set; }
}

public class RaceEvent
{
    [Key]
    public int RaceEventID { get; set; }


}

public class Runner
{
    [Key]
    public int RunnerID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public virtual RaceEvent RaceEvent { get; set; }

}

Any question let me know.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That basically confirmed what I was doing. I also found a post by Julia Lerman (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/hh134698) containing a very simple model that I cut and pasted into a test project. And the data model in the Server explorer still showed two gold keys, so that my just be an artifact of the Sql Ce data viewer (ErikEJ). My real problem had to with the fact that I was copying in the RaceEvent from someplace that was detached from the context. All I really needed to do was set the RaceEventId and leave the RaceEvent empty. Then it worked. Thanks again! – Dave Hanna Jun 21 '11 at 3:05
    
Hello Dave, ErikEJ here, could you share your SDF with me, so I can fix the potential problem with the key indicators? You can email me via my blog contact info. – ErikEJ Jun 24 '11 at 11:46

You need to override the model creating in the DbContext. Below is a sample for AnsNet_User & AspNet_Roles N:N relationship

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder dbModelBuilder)
{
    dbModelBuilder.Entity<aspnet_Users>().HasMany(a => a.aspnet_Roles).WithMany(b => 
    b.aspnet_Users).Map( 
        m =>
        {
            m.MapLeftKey("UserId");
            m.MapRightKey("RoleId");
            m.ToTable("aspnet_UsersInRoles");
        });

    base.OnModelCreating(dbModelBuilder);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the the time to respond. I do think that AN answer, but it's not the one I'm looking for. As I understand it, the point of Code First is that, if you specify your domain objects right, you don't need to explicitly use the API to build your model. As I understood it, I think I've got the domain objects specified right, but it's not getting the model right, so there's something I don't understand. – Dave Hanna Jun 19 '11 at 13:22

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