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I have a very simple parser rule (for AXE), like this:

auto space = axe::r_lit(' ');
auto spaces = space & space & space;

The last line compiles and works as expected in VC2010, but gives a strange error in gcc 4.6:

parsers.cpp:68:34: error: conversion from 
'axe::r_and_t<
    axe::r_and_t<axe::r_char_t<char>&, axe::r_char_t<char>&>, 
    axe::r_char_t<char>&
>' to non-scalar type 
'axe::r_and_t<
    axe::r_and_t<axe::r_char_t<char>&, axe::r_char_t<char>&>&, 
    axe::r_char_t<char>&
>' requested

I wonder, whether it's a (known) bug in gcc, and whether it's even possible to get conversion errors with auto declaration. Shouldn't the deduced type for auto be always exactly the same type as the initializer?

AXE overloads operator& like this:

template<class R1, class R2>
r_and_t<
    typename std::enable_if<
       is_rule<typename std::remove_reference<R1>::type>::value, R1>::type, 
    typename std::enable_if<
       is_rule<typename std::remove_reference<R2>::type>::value, R2>::type
>
operator& (R1&& r1, R2&& r2)
{
    return r_and_t<R1, R2>(std::forward<R1>(r1), std::forward<R2>(r2));
}

I wasn't able to reduce the problem to a short test case, unfortunately every time I try to come with simple example, it compiles.

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Do we know if the problem is with initializing the auto variable, or if it is one of the & operators having a problem with a temporary? –  Bo Persson Jun 19 '11 at 12:18
    
@Bo Persson: it looks like the problem is with auto, because this line: space & space & space; compiles without problems. Looking at the error message, compiler correctly identified the right side type, but for some reason decided to assign auto a different type, which resulted in conversion error. –  Gene Bushuyev Jun 19 '11 at 15:38
1  
It doesn't seem to have to do with auto, but with the fact that R1 in your second &-use (E & space, where E is the rvalue result of the first & use) seems to be a T&, instead of a T (as required by C++0x). Smells like a GCC problem to me, right now. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 19 '11 at 16:12
    
@Johannes Schaub: yes, it looks like compiler missed the rvalue, but even with that why would it ever have different types on right- and left-hand side with auto? –  Gene Bushuyev Jun 19 '11 at 16:20
    
@Gene the problem is not with auto, I think. It's with a mismatch between the type of the return expression and the return type of the second instantiation of operator&. But that indicates that R1 would be a different type in the body of operator& than in the declaration section. Does it make a difference if you change operator& to use the auto name() -> ... notation? Just guessing... –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 19 '11 at 16:21
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5 Answers

auto is not always exactly the type of initializer, because auto is dropping references, making it type T where you would expect T&. If you need reference - spell auto&.

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That is correct, I should have phrased it more precisely as deduced from initializer instead of using the same type as the initializer, because the same is subject to the type deduction rules, which vary for different language constructs. But the question is still the same, compiler seem to have deduced the type differently during two phases of lookup, which I believe is a bug. –  Gene Bushuyev Nov 28 '11 at 19:40
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Don't rate this answer, it's for information purposes only

This was indeed a bug in previous versions of gcc, it was fixed in gcc-4.7.0.

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1  
This should be up-voted and accepted as the correct answer, as it may help people in the future. –  Adrian McCarthy May 18 '12 at 21:20
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The problem is in the references.

parsers.cpp:68:34: error: conversion from 
'axe::r_and_t<
    axe::r_and_t<axe::r_char_t<char>&, axe::r_char_t<char>&>, 
    axe::r_char_t<char>&
>' to non-scalar type 
'axe::r_and_t<
    axe::r_and_t<axe::r_char_t<char>&, axe::r_char_t<char>&>&, 
    axe::r_char_t<char>&
>' requested

The first template argument is axe::r_and_t<axe::r_char_t<char>&, axe::r_char_t<char>&> for the first one, and axe::r_and_t<axe::r_char_t<char>&, axe::r_char_t<char>&>& for the second. This is a template argument mismatch- probably in the return value. Most likely, it occurs because Visual Studio's SFINAE implementation is dodgy at best and it doesn't implement two-phase lookup properly, and it's possible that the GCC version is picking a different overload to Visual Studio.

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The point is, there shouldn't be any problem at all if auto is used. Unless the problem is really with space & space & space -- but the OP says that this compiles OK as a stand-alone line. –  TonyK Oct 2 '11 at 16:36
    
Two pieces of information lead me to believe that it's a compiler error. First, it's hard to envision how auto can possibly lead to this error. Second, this error only appears in template code. Gcc unlike VC10 implements two phase lookup, and probably somehow it deduced type differently in the two phases. –  Gene Bushuyev Oct 26 '11 at 23:17
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Try taking the compiler at its word, with this version:

axe::r_and_t<
axe::r_and_t<axe::r_char_t<char>&, axe::r_char_t<char>&>, 
axe::r_char_t<char>&
> spaces = space & space & space ;

What happens?

Edited to add: I just noticed that this question is three months old. So never mind. But did it ever get resolved?

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1  
I tend to believe it's a compiler error. I didn't have a chance to try more recent version of gcc. There are no errors if actual type is used instead of auto, there isn't error if an auto declared in non-template function either. My guess it's compiler two phase lookup bug, when the type inferred during the first pass differs from the type inferred during instantiation. –  Gene Bushuyev Oct 26 '11 at 23:11
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Hm...i wondered why gcc and vc++ compilers are that different...got almost the same problem here: AXE Parser Generator and mingw gcc 4.6 operator &

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