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Is there any standard method in java to convert IBM 370(in the form of bytes) to IEEE format.?Any algorithm for the conversion would help..

I tried writing a java code..But i fail to understand where do i go wrong. When i give the input as -2.000000000000000E+02, i'm getting the value as -140.0 in IEEE format. and in othercase when i give the input as 3.140000000000000E+00 i'm getting the value as 3.1712502374909226 in IEEE format Any help on this would be highly appreciated

        private void conversion() {
          byte[] buffer = //bytes to be read(8 bytes);
    int sign = (buffer[0] & 0x80);
    // Extract exponent.
    int exp = ((buffer[0] & 0x7f) - 64) * 4 - 1;
    //Normalize the mantissa.
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {//since 4 bits per hex digit
        if ((buffer[1] & 0x80) == 0) {
            buffer = leftShift(buffer);
            exp = exp - 1;
        }
    }

    // Put sign and mantissa back in 8-byte number
    buffer = rightShift(buffer);// make room for longer exponent
    buffer = rightShift(buffer);
    buffer = rightShift(buffer);
    exp = exp + 1023;//Excess 1023 format
    int temp = exp & 0x0f;//Low 4 bits go into B(1)
    buffer[1]= (byte)((buffer[1]&0xf) | (temp *16));
    buffer[0]= (byte)(sign | ((exp/16) & 0x7f));
    }

     private byte[] rightShift(byte[] buf) {
    int newCarry = 0;
    int oldCarry = 0;
    for(int i = 1; i<buf.length; i++) {
        newCarry = buf[i] & 1;
        buf[i] = (byte)((buf[i] & 0xFE)/2 + (oldCarry != 0 ? 0x80 : 0));
        oldCarry = newCarry;
    }
    return buf;
}

private byte[] leftShift(byte[] buf) {
    int newCarry = 0;
    int oldCarry = 0;
    for(int i = buf.length-1; i>0; i--) {
        newCarry = buf[i] & 1;
        buf[i] = (byte)((buf[i] & 0x7F)*2 + (oldCarry != 0 ? 1 : 0));
        oldCarry = newCarry;
    }   
    return buf;
}
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Which flavour of IBM number are you talking about? There are three binary floating point representations ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Floating_Point_Architecture ) and a variety of other formats. –  Stephen C Jun 19 '11 at 3:39
    
Hi, here i'm talking about Double-precision 64 bit –  Vineet Jun 19 '11 at 7:59
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2 Answers 2

I can see a couple different solutions to your question:

  • Use the text representation as an intermediary reference
  • Do a straight conversion C code
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This IBM Technical Article includes algorithms for converting from IBM floating point formats to IEE floating point.

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