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When I define(?) a resource e.g. to ensure dir structure, are there any loops available?

Like that:

  for X in [app1,app2] do:
    file { '/opt/app/' + X:
      ensure => directory,
      owner  => 'root',
      group  => 'root',
      mode   => '0644',
    }

I have tens of directories and I am really tired with declaring it in puppet.. It would take 15 LOC of bash.

Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 30 down vote accepted

In the puppet language, no there are no loops.

But you can use an array instead of a simple string for the title and declare several resources at the same time with the same params:

$b = '/opt/app'
file { [ "$b/app1", "$b/app2" ]:
  ensure => directory,
  owner  => 'root',
  group  => 'root',
  mode   => 0644,
}

You can also declare many resources of the same type with different params by ending each resource with a ;, which is a bit more compact than repeating the file and the {s and }s:

file {
  [ "$b/app1", "$b/app2" ]:
    ensure => directory,
    owner  => 'root',
    group  => 'root',
    mode   => 0755;
  [ "$b/app1/secret", "$b/app2/secret" ]:
    ensure => directory,
    owner  => 'root',
    group  => 'root',
    mode   => 0700;
}

In the specific case of files, you can set up a source and use recursion:

file { "/opt/app":
  source => "puppet:///appsmodule/appsdir",
  recurse => true;
}

(that would require having a source of that directory structure for puppet to use as the source)

You can define a new resource type to reuse a portion of the param multiple times:

define foo {
  file {
    "/tmp/app/${title}":
      ensure => directory,
      owner  => 'root',
      mode   => 0755;
    "/tmp/otherapp/${title}":
      ensure => link,
      target => "/tmp/app/${title}",
      require => File["/tmp/app/${title}"]
  }
}

foo { ["app1", "app2", "app3", "app4"]: } 

Starting with Puppet 2.6, there's a Ruby DSL available that has all the looping functionality you could ask for: http://www.puppetlabs.com/blog/ruby-dsl/ (I've never used it, however). In Puppet 3.2, they introduced some experimental loops, however those features may change or go away in later releases.

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1  
Thanks! how to get this working: file { [X,Y]: ensure=link, target => [X1+X,Y1+Y] } ? –  user425720 Jun 20 '11 at 18:07
1  
You could use a define. Added an example to my answer –  freiheit Jun 20 '11 at 18:49
    
aah, perfect. Thanks! –  user425720 Jun 20 '11 at 20:43
2  
Note: recently (spring/summer 2013), loops and iterators have been added to the language. –  freiheit Jun 10 '13 at 20:49

As of version 3.2 there are lambdas

You must set parser = future in puppet.conf.

$a = [1,2,3]
each($a) |$value| { notice $value }

Another option for declaring multiple defined types is create_resources. Pass it a hash of hashes:

create_resources(file, {
 '/tmp/test1' => { 
      ensure => directory,
      owner  => 'root',
      group  => 'root',
      mode   => '0644',
    },  
 '/tmp/test2' => { 
      ensure => directory,
      owner  => 'www-data',
      group  => 'www-data',
      mode   => '0755',
    },  
})
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5  
The each() solution is the only real solution to this problem I've seen so far. –  markus Nov 14 '13 at 14:00
    
@markus, Agreed, however, to be fair, I'm not sure it was available when this question was originally asked back in 2011. Hoping this bubbles up to the top of this question though so people don't waste time, now that lambdas are available. –  quickshiftin Nov 14 '13 at 15:59
3  
If you're using puppet apply make sure to enable the future parser puppet apply --parser=future –  quickshiftin Mar 13 '14 at 16:39

Yes. "Ruby DSL" could help, just use file extension ".rb" instead of ".pp" in manifest and you can define puppet "type" like this:

define 'myapps::structure', :applist do
   @applist.each do |app|
       file( @name+'/'+app, 
             :ensure => directory,
             :owner  => 'root',
             :group  => 'root',
             :mode   => '0644')
   end
end

Classes and nodes also can be defined in similar way. Notice however that this feature is deprecated since release 3

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