Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm reading a perl book but only has seen examples for functions by sub keyword.

Is there an example to define and use my own class?

How to rewrite the PHP below to perl?

class name {

   function meth() {
     echo 'Hello World';
   }
}

$inst = new name;
$inst->meth();
share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

The basic-perl way is:

In a file 'Foo.pm':

use strict;
use warnings;
package Foo;
sub new {
   my $class = shift;
   my $self = bless {}, $class;
   my %args = @_;
   $self->{_message} = $args{message};

   # do something with arguments to new()
   return $self;
}

sub message {
   my $self = shift;
   return $self->{_message};
}

sub hello {
   my $self = shift;
   print $self->message(), "\n";
}
1;

In your script:

use Foo;
my $foo = Foo->new(message => "Hello world");
$foo->hello();

You may prefer to use Moose, though, in which case file 'Foo.pm' is:

package Foo;
use Moose;
has message => (is => 'rw', isa => 'Str');
sub hello {
    my $self = shift;
    print $self->message, "\n";
}
1;

Because Moose makes all the accessors for you. Your main file is exactly the same...

Or you can use Moose extensions to make everything prettier, in which case Foo.pm becomes:

package Foo;
use Moose;
use MooseX::Method::Signatures;
has message => (is => 'rw', isa => 'Str');

method hello() {
    print $self->message, "\n";
}
1;
share|improve this answer
    
what is moose? –  compile-fan Jun 19 '11 at 4:59
2  
Moose is a higher level object framework for Perl, a way of writing code without having to do some of the low-level things yourself and a powerful extensible object language in itself. You'll need to understand the plain Perl example first, though. As others have said, have a look at Chromatic's modern Perl book for a step-by-step introduction, you won't get it straight away just by looking at working code. –  Alex Jun 19 '11 at 5:06
    
will using Moose bring additional overhead? –  compile-fan Jun 19 '11 at 5:14
1  
@compile-fan: Yes, Moose makes the program slower. It's more noticeable if you have a lot of Moose classes. However, it will make the code more sane. –  Karel Bílek Jun 19 '11 at 5:18
    
@Karel Moose makes compile time slower. While Method::Signatures and some other tools do add runtime overhead, pure Moose runtime typically isn't significantly slower than the comparable non-Moose code, and can sometimes be faster due to optimizations that Moose chooses to make in the generated code. –  perigrin Jun 20 '11 at 4:30
add comment

Modern Perl is an excellent book, available for free, which has a thorough section on writing OO Perl with Moose. (Begins on page 110 in the PDF version.)

share|improve this answer
    
I just want a hello world example here. –  compile-fan Jun 19 '11 at 3:47
5  
@compile-fan - And I want a pony. Learning a new language takes work. –  Sherm Pendley Jun 19 '11 at 9:53
add comment

I would start with the perlboot man page.

From there you can move on to perltoot, perltooc, and perlbot...

share|improve this answer
    
can you provide a hello world example right here? –  compile-fan Jun 19 '11 at 3:41
5  
@compile-fan - If you refuse to take ten minutes to read the documentation you have no right to be trying to use OO in Perl. –  Chris Lutz Jun 19 '11 at 5:16
1  
@Chris Lutz: your answer is too mean. The question is simple enough and, for example, someone can be lost in perldoc tutorials. –  Karel Bílek Jun 19 '11 at 6:37
2  
@Karel Bílek - If someone tried to read the tutorials and didn't get it, they'd come here asking for more tutorials. If someone didn't know the language, was on a deadline and needed code to copy-and-paste to get working cargo-cult style, they'd cone here asking us, say, to provide them with a simple example of how to do the equivalent of some piece of code they wrote in another language. OP has given no indication of any interest in learning. –  Chris Lutz Jun 19 '11 at 7:06
    
@Karel - "True" ne "mean" ne "wrong". Sometimes the truth hurts. –  Sherm Pendley Jun 19 '11 at 9:46
add comment

I found this is a more minimalistic version:

package HelloWorld;
sub new
{
    my $class = shift;
    my $self = { };
    bless $self, $class;
    return $self;
}
sub print
{
    print "Hello World!\n";
}

package main;
$hw = HelloWorld->new();
$hw->print();

For anyone who wishes to play with this further fork it at https://gist.github.com/1033749

share|improve this answer
1  
package is what Perl uses for your classname, along with some special variable to enable inheritance. Methods are just subroutines in a package, that when called with the ->() get passed the object as their first argument. –  Alex Jun 19 '11 at 5:08
4  
@compile, if you had read the tutorial and manual links provided by others earlier, you would already know the answer to that question. –  Charles Jun 19 '11 at 5:16
2  
The minimalist version is sub new{bless({},$_[0])}. (Called as HelloWorld->new->print of course.) –  Chris Lutz Jun 19 '11 at 5:20
1  
It's weird because it was implemented on top of Perl, which was already something like 10 years old at the time, so everything that already worked had to keep on working. OO itself was less developed back then, so many of the conventions that now exist didn't. Thankfully Perl is sufficiently malleable that any ugliness can usually be hidden behind something like Moose, which came along once the community figured out the best ways of working with Perl and OO. –  Alex Jun 19 '11 at 8:55
1  
@compile-fan - You don't see a class keyword because that's not a keyword in Perl. Perl seems weird because you're new to it and haven't bothered to read the introductory material provided by others earlier. Just like any other language, Perl is difficult at first, but it becomes second nature once you get used to it. –  Sherm Pendley Jun 19 '11 at 9:51
show 4 more comments

The example as posted by Sukima but using MooseX::Declare which implements (without a source filter!) a more declarative syntax for Moose. It is about as close to the example given by the OP as Perl is going to get.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use MooseX::Declare;

class HelloWorld {

  method print () {
    print "Hello World!\n";
  }

}

no MooseX::Declare;

my $hw = HelloWorld->new;
$hw->print;

an only slightly more complicated example shows more of the full power of the Moose/MooseX::Declare syntax:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use MooseX::Declare;

class HelloWorld {

  has 'times' => (isa => 'Num', is => 'rw', default => 0);

  method print (Str $name?) {
    $name //= "World";      #/ highlight fix
    print "Hello $name!\n";

    $self->times(1 + $self->times);
  }

}

no MooseX::Declare;

my $hw = HelloWorld->new;
$hw->print;
$hw->print("Joel");
print "Called " . $hw->times . " times\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, MooseX::Declare is very nice. Although almost a whole different language. I use it when being very very good, and Moose/Mx:M:S when I'm being more normal. –  Alex Jun 20 '11 at 0:10
1  
@Alex, In trying to learn OO Perl, I challenged my self to write a large program using Perl. I settled on a monopoly clone. I tried using old-style OO Perl and had to give up, I couldn't follow it anymore. My Mx::D version is on github at github.com/jberger/Opoly . Its not nearly done yet, but it is far more readable! –  Joel Berger Jun 20 '11 at 14:08
    
p.s. new link github.com/jberger/Games-Opoly –  Joel Berger Jan 11 '12 at 12:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.