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Is Akka suitable to use in a system where nodes are expected to be moving in and out of wifi coverage? What aspects have to be considered (e.g. what transport protocols are preferred)?

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What would your messaging semantics be? –  Viktor Klang Jun 19 '11 at 14:23
    
Request-reply as well as fire and forget (if possible). –  Tobias Furuholm Jun 19 '11 at 18:53
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No, I mean, at-most-once, at-least-once, how long would outbound messages be retained, would they overflow to disk, is there an upper bound on the messages in the outbound queue, and if so, what should happen if that limit is reached? –  Viktor Klang Jun 19 '11 at 22:15
    
Sorry for not replying sooner but i had to do some reading about messaging semantics :) I think that the system could be designed to use at-least-once (which is preferred, right?). Most messages can be thrown away as nodes are disconnected (basically a new "session" will be started when a node connects/reconnects). Some messages will however have to overflow to disk, probably without an upper bound... –  Tobias Furuholm Jun 20 '11 at 20:27
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Akka remote actors has your desired semantics and you can use supervisor hierarchies to handle the non-delivery errors. You haven't really given any specifics other than that, so I can only comment on what you've said so far. –  Viktor Klang Jun 25 '11 at 21:03
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Akka is suitable for systems with transient network coverage. Supervisor hierarchies can be used to handle the non-delivery errors as Viktor has pointed out in the comments to the question. For more details see the conversation in the comments to the question.

To verify this I have done some testing with two computers and physically switched the network connection to one of them on and off. There were no problems with hanging sockets and messages that were queued during the outage were delivered when the connection was (physically) reestablished, just as expected.

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Thank you Tobias –  Viktor Klang Jul 31 '11 at 20:40
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