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If you run the following code snippet:

 Manipulate[
   Graphics3D[
     {Cuboid[{{-1, -1, -1}, {1, 1, 1}}], Sphere[{5, 5, 5}, 1]}, 
      ViewPoint -> {1, 1, a}, AxesOrigin -> {0,0,0}
   ], 
   {a, 1, 100}
 ]

and move the viewpoint from (1,1,1) to (1,1,100) with the slider you will see that after a while the objects remain fixed in size.

Questions.

1. When I move the viewpoint further away from the scene I want the objects to become smaller. How should this be done in Mathematica?

( EDIT: )

2. What is the position of the 'camera' in relation to Viewpoint?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

See ViewAngle. Under "More Information", note that the default setting ViewAngle -> Automatic is effectively equivalent to ViewAngle -> All when you zoom far enough out.

You just need to add an explicit setting for ViewAngle:

Manipulate[
 Graphics3D[{Cuboid[{{-1, -1, -1}, {1, 1, 1}}], Sphere[{5, 5, 5}, 1]},
   ViewPoint -> {1, 1, a}, AxesOrigin -> {0, 0, 0}, 
  ViewAngle -> 35 Degree], {a, 1, 100}]
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Thanks, I need to study all the Viewpoint related properties first. I don't think I get it yet, although the behavior of Graphics3D has become somewhat clearer. –  ndroock1 Jun 19 '11 at 12:13

As far as I know, the camera viewpoint really coincides with the position given by ViewPoint. Because Mathematica scales the result to fit in about the same image you don't see much changes but they are there. The perspective changes considerably. Try, for instance, to move away from a semi-transparant square and you'll see that the farther you go, the more the projection becomes an orthogonal projection:

enter image description here

If you want to scale your image according to distance you can use ImageSize. SphericalRegion is good to stabilize the image.

Manipulate[
 vp = {1, 1, a};
 Graphics3D[{Cuboid[{{-1, -1, -1}, {1, 1, 1}}], Sphere[{5, 5, 5}, 1]},
  ViewPoint -> vp,
  AxesOrigin -> {0, 0, 0},
  SphericalRegion -> True,
  ImageSize -> 500/Norm[vp]],
 {a, 1, 100}
 ]

enter image description here

[animation made with some ImagePadding to keep object in the center. I stopped the animation at a = 10, the image gets pretty small after that]

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@Sjoerd, Then how can I 'walk through' a scene of objects? Or fly through a virtual solar system ( I remember I have seen that one in Mathematica once ) ? –  ndroock1 Jun 19 '11 at 11:44
    
@ndroock1 It seems you should now have the tools to do just that. You might need ViewCenter and ViewVertical too. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 19 '11 at 11:51
    
@ndroock1 what is wrong with Manipulate[vp = {1, 1, a}; Graphics3D[{Cuboid[{{-1, -1, -1}, {1, 1, 1}}], Sphere[{5, 5, 5}, 1]},ViewPoint -> vp, ViewAngle [Rule] Pi/4, PlotRange [Rule] {{0, 10}, {0, 10}, {0, 10}}, AxesOrigin -> {0, 0, 0}, SphericalRegion -> True], {a, 1, 10}] –  acl Jun 19 '11 at 12:03
    
@ndroock1 I think Andrew's ViewPoint approach is the way to go if you go beyond the simple scene of your question. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 19 '11 at 12:16
    
@Sjoerd, As I commented on Andrew's answer I need to study the ViewPoint related properties and probably more. It seems I don't quite understand the Graphics3D command yet. –  ndroock1 Jun 19 '11 at 12:24

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