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In "The D Programming Language" book I see the following:

Usually the case expressions are compile-time constants, but D allows variables, too, and guarantees lexical-order evaluation up to the first match.

Code:

void main()
{
   string foo = "foo";
   string bar = "bar";

   string mrX;

   switch (mrX)
   {
      case foo:
         writeln(foo);
         break;
      case bar:
         writeln(bar);
         break;
      default:
         writeln("who knows");
   }
}

Result:

Error: case must be a string or an integral constant, not foo

What's wrong?

PS. I use DMD32 D Compiler v2.053

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foo and bar probably needs to be immutable... –  Per Alexandersson Jun 19 '11 at 9:55
1  
There's quite a few things that TDPL says that DMD doesn't yet implement. Luckily DMD is improving at rapid pace, so hopefully this won't be for too long :-) –  Peter Alexander Jun 19 '11 at 18:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It appears to be a bug. It works just fine with variables of type int. I've reported the bug for you: http://d.puremagic.com/issues/show_bug.cgi?id=6176

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Maybe it's a bug but it can't use variables. I could get your example to work like this:

void main()
{
   immutable string foo = "foo";
   const string bar = "bar";
   string mrX;
   switch (mrX)
   {
      case to!string(foo):
         writeln(foo);
         break;
      case to!string(bar):
         writeln(bar);
         break;
      default:
         writeln("who knows");
   }
}
share|improve this answer

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