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Is it possible to serve precompiled assets with nginx directly? Serving assets dynamically with Rails is like 20 times slower (4000 req/sec vs 200 req/sec in my virtualbox).

I guess it can be done with some rewrite rule in nginx.conf. The problem is, however, that these filenames include md5 hash of the content, so I don't really understand what can be done with this.

If its not possible I don't get the whole idea with Rails 3.1 asset pipelines. Reducing client bandwidth and page load time at the cost of x20 server load?

Any ideas?

UPD: So, I managed to setup my nginx and Rails in a way, when everything in my application is served at the speed of ~3500-4000 requests/sec.

First of all I added two virtual hosts, with one serving as a caching proxy to another and discovered that assets are served at the speed I wanted (4k). Then I connected my Rails application with memcached (nothing special so far, just one line in application.rb: ActionController::Base.cache_store = :mem_cache_store, "localhost")

Then I added things like expires_in 1.hour, :public => true if !signed_in?; to my controllers to change default caching policy of Rails content and got speed boost around 500 requests/per second for my dynamic pages (before that it was something close to 200, and it was ~50 before I ever started this all).

Now, when my nginx config files look like this:

nginx.conf:

...
proxy_cache_path  /tmp/blog keys_zone=one:8m max_size=1000m inactive=600m;
proxy_temp_path /tmp;
gzip  off;
include /opt/nginx/conf/sites-enabled/*;

sites-enabled/blog:

server {
        listen   8080;
        server_name  blindsight;

        root   /home/mike/rails/blog/public;
        rails_env production;

        # serve static content directly
        location ~* \.(ico|jpg|gif|png|swf|html)$ {
          if (-f $request_filename) {
            expires max;
            break;
          }
        }

        passenger_enabled on;

        location ~ /\.ht {
          deny  all;
        }
}

sites-enabled/main:

server {

    listen   80;
    server_name  blindsight;

    location /authorize
    {
       proxy_pass_header Cookie;
       proxy_pass_header Set-Cookie;
       proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8080;
    }

    location /admin
    {
       proxy_pass_header Set-Cookie;
       proxy_pass_header Cookie;
       proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8080;
    }

    location / {
    root /home/mike/rails/blog/public;

        # All POST requests go directly
        if ($request_method = POST) {
          proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8080;
          break;
        }

    proxy_redirect off;
    proxy_pass_header Cookie;
    proxy_ignore_headers Set-Cookie;
    proxy_hide_header Set-Cookie;
    proxy_set_header Host $host;
    proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
    proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
    proxy_cache one;
    proxy_cache_key blog$request_uri;
    proxy_cache_valid 200 302  5s;
    proxy_cache_valid 404      1m;
    proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8080;

    }

Everything is fast like a bloody lightning :) Thank you, guys.

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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Although I don't have experience working with rails, my guess is you're using nginx + passenger with the proxy_pass directive. It sounds like your "static assets" have dynamic urls to serve the assets, which prevents you from configuring nginx to serve the content from directly from nginx through specialized location paths like the follow snippet:

#  static content
location ~* ^.+.(jpg|jpeg|gif|css|png|js|ico|xml)$ {
  # access_log        off;
  expires           15d;
}

If this is correct, my advice to you is to try using nginx's proxy_cache directive. This will let you control how often nginx goes to passenger to "regenerate" the response nginx saved previously requested and cached. This server fault answer should help you should demonstrate the use. With proxy_cache, you can cache any response such as dynamically generated images or even just json/javascript/html content.

You could also try the memcached module, which will give you a more fine-grained control over caching. The down side to this is you have to actually push your files into memcache with code to populate it. The upside is, you can centrally cache your content in some sort of memcached cluster.

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Well, I don't use proxy_pass, its just default passenger installation, where passenger is compiled into nginx as a module. –  daekrist Jun 20 '11 at 2:57
    
Maybe you could try out nginx + standalone-passenger to be able to leverage proxy_cache. This will give you an added ability to scale up multiple passenger servers while keeping fewer nginx servers for static content. However, this does complicate your infrastructure a bit unfortunately. –  pcting Jun 20 '11 at 22:32
    
Another note, nginx can leverage unix sockets for the proxy_pass directive: wiki.nginx.org/HttpProxyModule#proxy_pass –  pcting Jun 20 '11 at 22:41
    
I've been looking for something more elegant, "all-in-one" solution (like few more directives in nginx conf), than creating massive chains of applications :) –  daekrist Jun 21 '11 at 2:06
1  
A hack "all in one" solution could be to create two virtual hosts on nginx; 1st virtual host will host the "static content cache" and is also the reverse proxy for a 2nd virtual host (possibly listening on a separate socket) that hosts the passenger requests can be sent to. This will remove the need to maintain two nginx processes separately. –  pcting Jun 21 '11 at 6:51
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Following on from above with some extra bits I gleaned from the interweb:

For Rails 3.1:

location ~* ^/assets/ {
    # Per RFC2616 - 1 year maximum expiry
    # http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html
    expires 1y;
    add_header Cache-Control public;

    # Some browsers still send conditional-GET requests if there's a
    # Last-Modified header or an ETag header even if they haven't
    # reached the expiry date sent in the Expires header.
    add_header Last-Modified "";
    add_header ETag "";
    break;
}

For Rails 3.0 use

location ~* ^/(images|javascripts|stylesheets)/ {
    ... copy block from above ...
}
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2  
+1 I just used your example to solve my problem. However for my Rails 3.0.10 app I had to use location ~* ^/(images|javascripts|stylesheets)/ { instead. GREAT WORK! –  Andrew Burns Feb 16 '12 at 18:02
1  
@AndrewBurns - thanks for the feedback - I've updated my answer with your comments –  Ben W Feb 17 '12 at 5:07
    
The code for Rails 3.1 seems to prevent nginx from serving any files that don't have the md5 hash specified. So if you request site.com/assets/image.png instead of site.com/assets/image--637ec83d0c00b975de4a984699e04993.png, you will get a 404 not found. –  NudeCanalTroll Apr 18 '12 at 1:21
1  
@NudeCanalTroll That is more to do with sprockets than the NGINX code above. Make sure you're running asset compilation - rake assets:precompile - during deployment –  Ben W Apr 26 '12 at 21:52
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Try adding this to your NGINX config:

server {

  ...

  location ~* ^/assets {
    expires max;
    add_header Cache-Control public;
    break;
  }

  ...

}
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Doesn't seem to work. When I add this, I'm getting 404 not found for the assets. –  daekrist Jun 21 '11 at 2:05
    
Are you searching for the precompiled asset path? (ie: application-fasodfjaoirj2o34joij3.css or just application.css) –  bodacious Jun 21 '11 at 9:34
    
Well, I managed to resolve this problem in a bit another way after all :) –  daekrist Jun 22 '11 at 1:26
    
Works great for me with Rails 3. –  Dogweather Dec 12 '13 at 4:32
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Well, I know this is an old question, but the Passenger standalone does it as follows:

    # Rails asset pipeline support.
    location ~ ^/assets/ {
        error_page 490 = @static_asset;
        error_page 491 = @dynamic_request;
        recursive_error_pages on;

        if (-f $request_filename) {
            return 490;
        }
        if (!-f $request_filename) {
            return 491;
        }
    }
    location @static_asset {
        gzip_static on;
        expires max;
        add_header Cache-Control public;
        add_header ETag "";
    }
    location @dynamic_request {
        passenger_enabled on;
    }
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as a note, I think that when you use nginx with passenger today (not the proxy_pass way, the normal way), it automatically sets up the expiration headers for you in a good way... –  rogerdpack Aug 15 '13 at 23:12
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maybe you should run rake assets:precompile It will stick precompiled assets under /public/assets/

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precompilation doesn't set up the necessary cache settings, just precompiles the assets to be available in static locations –  galileoMonkey Aug 15 '11 at 0:09
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