Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I saw the railscast at http://railscasts.com/episodes/257-request-specs-and-capybara which describes how to use Capybara with RSpec on a Rails application.

Is it possible to use Capybara/Selenium to test a web application over which you have no access to the code, or it is not a Ruby/Rack application. Worded another way, is it possible to black-box test a web app using Capybara/Selenium? If so, how?

I ask because all of the code samples imply the existence of a Ruby or Rails code base.

share|improve this question

Yes. You just need to use a "visit" function which goes directly to the URL you want to test.

visit 'http://www.gmail.com'

Then, you can find any of the HTML elements using capybara functions

find("input#Email").set("superman")
all("input#Email")[0].set("superman")
share|improve this answer

Sure, in fact, the most common initial test is to automate www.google.com. It turns out to be a bad first attempt (the modern Google is very AJAXy and subtle), but it's what everybody thinks of first. Followed quickly by GMail, which is even moreso. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
can you point me to a URL which describes how to automate the testing of google.com? – Jay Godse Jun 19 '11 at 18:49

I don't see any reason why that wouldn't be possible. Assuming your Web Application is accessible via HTTP, you should be fine (this is obviously VERY likely to be true).

All RSpec Request Specs are basically black box tests. That's the point of Request Specs - you want to simulate a real user and exercise your whole Application stack - starting with HTML views down to database access. The same is true for cucumber features.

Writing you Specs might be a little less comfortable, because you can't rely on the Web Application to adhere to Rails conventions.

Anyway... I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.