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How can I get the name of largest available type in my compiler? Is it possible at all?
Something like:

auto largest = get_largest_type();  

and auto in my case would be long long.

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1  
you mean the largest primitive type? What about int[100000]? That's a pretty big type, does that count? And, of course, what is this for? –  jalf Jun 19 '11 at 15:17
    
@jalf yes, I did mean largest primitive type available –  smallB Jun 19 '11 at 15:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, depending on how badly you need this, you can try some serious metaprograming here...

Firstly, you will obviously need some kind of "pack" defining all available primitive types, so here it is:

template<typename... TYPES>
class pack
{};

typedef pack<float, double, long double, unsigned short, unsigned int,
    unsigned long, unsigned long long, short, int, long, long long> primitive_types;

Then you will need a way to sort this types in respect to size, so firstly, lets define a metafunction able to implement a stric weak ordering for the sizes:

template<typename L, typename R>
class smaller
{
    public:
        static const bool value = sizeof(L) < sizeof(R);
};

Now, the sorting algorithm. Here I've arbitrarily chosen merge sort, which required 3 other metafunctions: pack_cat for concatenating packs, merge for merging them acording to the order, and halve for breaking packs in 2 other packs.

template<typename, typename>
class pack_cat;

template<typename... L, typename... R>
class pack_cat<pack<L...>, pack<R...>>
{
    public:
        typedef pack<L..., R...> type;
};

template<template<typename, typename> class, typename, typename>
class pack_merge;

template<template<typename, typename> class MF, typename HL, typename... TL, typename HR, typename... TR>
class pack_merge<MF, pack<HL, TL...>, pack<HR, TR...>>
{
    public:
        typedef typename std::conditional<MF<HR, HL>::value,
                typename pack_cat<pack<HR>, typename pack_merge<MF, pack<HL, TL...>, pack<TR...>>::type>::type,
                typename pack_cat<pack<HL>, typename pack_merge<MF, pack<TL...>, pack<HR, TR...>>::type>::type>::type type;
};

template<template<typename, typename> class MF, typename H, typename... T>
class pack_merge<MF, pack<H, T...>, pack<>>
{
    public:
        typedef pack<H, T...> type;
};

template<template<typename, typename> class MF, typename... R>
class pack_merge<MF, pack<>, pack<R...>>
{
    public:
        typedef pack<R...> type;
};

template<typename>
class halve;

template<typename A, typename B, typename... T>
class halve<pack<A, B, T...>>
{
    public:
        typedef typename pack_cat<pack<A>, typename halve<pack<T...>>::L>::type L;
        typedef typename pack_cat<pack<B>, typename halve<pack<T...>>::R>::type R;
};

template<typename T>
class halve<pack<T>>
{
    public:
        typedef pack<T> L;
        typedef pack<> R;
};

template<>
class halve<pack<>>
{
    public:
        typedef pack<> L;
        typedef pack<> R;
};

template<template<typename, typename> class MF, typename P>
class pack_sort
{
    private:
        typedef typename halve<P>::L L;
        typedef typename halve<P>::R R;

    public:
        typedef typename pack_merge<MF, typename pack_sort<MF, L>::type, typename pack_sort<MF, R>::type>::type type;
};

template<template<typename, typename> class MF, typename H>
class pack_sort<MF, pack<H>>
{
    public:
        typedef pack<H> type;
};

template<template<typename, typename> class MF>
class pack_sort<MF, pack<>>
{
    public:
        typedef pack<> type;
};

Lastly you will need a metafunction for retrieving the last argument of a pack, which is straightforward to implement:

template<typename>
class pack_get_last;

template<typename H, typename... T>
class pack_get_last<pack<H, T...>>
{
    public:
        typedef typename pack_get_last<pack<T...>>::type type;

};

template<typename H>
class pack_get_last<pack<H>>
{
    public:
        typedef H type;
};

Now, a test program to prove you that all this junk code I wrote up there actually works:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

/* all those metafunctions come here */

int main()
{
    typename pack_get_last<typename pack_sort<smaller, primitive_types>::type>::type largest;

    if(std::is_same<decltype(largest), long double>::value)
        std::cout << "MATCH!\n";
}

Output in a x64 linux machine using gcc 4.6, where long double is the largest available simple primitive type:

MATCH!
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that's something. Thanks. –  smallB Jun 26 '11 at 6:59

No, this isn't possible. However, you can pretty much guarantee that 64bit is the largest type- I don't know of any compiler that offers 128bit. Failing that, get your user to pass it in as a template parameter or use compiler-specific defines to make a typedef.

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There's at least one, though not on all targets. –  Damon Jun 19 '11 at 16:10
    
What about SIMD-types? –  Simon Jun 19 '11 at 16:14
    
Long double is 128 bits long on some machines. –  David Hammen Jun 19 '11 at 16:20
    
you are not entirely correct. although c++0x does not provide a built-in mechanism like smallB expected, it is indeed possible, through metaprograming, to retrieve the largest avaiable primitive type in a given pair of machine and compiler, provided only that you know which the primitive types are. Please refer my answer for this question to understand how. –  brunocodutra Jun 25 '11 at 20:47

For integer types only, you can use the <cstdint> header, which allows you to do:

std::intmax_t largest;

I'm not aware of any such functionality that includes floating points types, though.

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I suppose to you could write a small program that reprocesses your main program. The small program could use sizeof() to compare all the numeric types to determine the largest. Then would replace the symbol "LARGEST" in your main program with the type what actually was the largest.

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You can use the std::numeric_limits template class to get some information regarding the primitive types which have specializations.

Not that on some compilers a long double is larger than the long long although on others a long double is the size of a double (MSVC).

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