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This is my code:

string Url = "http://illution.dk/";
WebClient Http = new WebClient();
Http.DownloadStringAsync(new Uri(Url));
Http.DownloadStringCompleted += new DownloadStringCompletedEventHandler(GetModelTypeResponse);

If I run this on a machine with no internet connection an error will be thrown. "Hostname could not be resolved"

Is there any way I can remove this error message? Or check if there isn't an internet connection?

Edit 1

try
{
ComputerInfo ComputerInfoComp = new ComputerInfo();
string Url = "http://illution.dk/"
WebClient Http = new WebClient();
Http.DownloadStringAsync(new Uri(Url));
Http.DownloadStringCompleted += new         DownloadStringCompletedEventHandler(GetModelTypeResponse);
ComputerInfoComp = null;
}
catch (System.Net.WebException e)
{
//
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check e.Error in your GetModelTypeResponse handler method. If e.Error is of type WebException then check webException.Status value. The value will be WebExceptionStatus.NameResolutionFailure in case of "Hostname could not be resolved" exception

public void GetModelTypeResponse(object sender, DownloadStringCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    var webException = e.Error as WebException;
    if (webException != null && 
        webException.Status == WebExceptionStatus.NameResolutionFailure)
    {
        // log
        return; // ignore
    }

    // proceed
    ..
}
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Thank you, it did the trick! –  Fredefl Jun 19 '11 at 15:31

Yes, by catching that particular exception. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173160(v=vs.80).aspx

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So, which one should i catch? –  Fredefl Jun 19 '11 at 15:22
    
This one? "System.Net.WebException"??? –  Fredefl Jun 19 '11 at 15:23
    
@Fredefl when you see the exception message "Hostname could not be resolved". It will also tell you the type of the exception. –  Bala R Jun 19 '11 at 15:25
    
Yes it does, and it is this one: System.Net.WebException –  Fredefl Jun 19 '11 at 15:26
    
But when i use catch (System.Net.WebException e) {/*Something*/} the error's still there –  Fredefl Jun 19 '11 at 15:27

Put your code in a try...catch block. Google exceptions for more information.

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Already tried that... –  Fredefl Jun 19 '11 at 15:24
    
@Fredefl: Then post your code!!! It works. I don't know what you did wrong because I can't see your code. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 19 '11 at 15:25

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