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Please try this:

function f1
{
    param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
    [string]
    $Text
    )
    $text
}

function f2
{
    param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
    #[string]
    $Text
    )
    $text
}

function f3
{
    param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$False,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
    [string]
    $Text
    )
    $text
}

f1 ''
f2 ''
f3 ''

Here f1 throws an error. Now try

f2 $null 
f3 $null    

This time only f2 throws an error. What I want is a function f, so that

f '' # is accepted
f $null # returns an error
share|improve this question
    
+1 for good question. –  empo Jun 19 '11 at 16:27
    
Sorry, I don't understand, your function 'f2' works as you want. f2 '' is accepted and f2 $null generate an error. –  JPBlanc Jun 19 '11 at 16:27
    
@JPB I think the problem there is about the data type. –  empo Jun 19 '11 at 16:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The Mandatory attribute blocks null and empty values and prompts you for a value. To allow empty values (including null) add the AllowEmptyString parameter attribute:

function f1
{
    param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
    [AllowEmptyString()]
    [string]$Text
    )
    $text
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your version is better than that of Roman Kuzmin, it rejects non strings like f1 @(1, 2). The fact that f1 $null is accepted seems to be the slightest problem. BTW this nearly identical to f3. –  bernd_k Jun 20 '11 at 10:11
    
Try to replace AllowEmptyString with ValidateNotNull. it allows empty strings but not nulls. –  Shay Levy Jun 20 '11 at 14:57
    
No, ValidateNotNull() fails for f1 ''. –  bernd_k Jun 21 '11 at 5:55

Here is the solution that fits the requirements with a caveat.

function f1
{
    param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
    $Text
    )
    Write-Host 'Working'
    $text
}

f1 ''
f1 $null

Output:

Working
f1 : Cannot bind argument to parameter 'Text' because it is null.

Caveat

In order to fit the requirements we have to omit the explicit type declaration of [string]. The problem is that PowerShell tends to convert nulls to empty strings everywhere where the [string] type is specified. Thus, if we use the type declaration then null value actually never comes to the function.

P.S. Here is a related issue submitted: It isn't possible to pass null as null into a .NET method that has a parameter of type String

share|improve this answer
    
I have just realized that this is exactly the function f2. So, that is not quite a real answer, perhaps :) –  Roman Kuzmin Jun 19 '11 at 17:04
1  
+1 That what I'am saying from the begining ;o) But you give the explanation, you are the guy. –  JPBlanc Jun 19 '11 at 17:06

Just for the sake of completeness, if you want your input be validated against string type, you can do it afterward parameters declaration:

function f1
{
    param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
    $Text
    )
    if (!($text -eq '') -and !($text -as [string])) {write-host "wrong type"; return }
    $text
}

This function behaves as follows:

  • Throws "Cannot bind argument.." exception when input is $null
  • Passes when input is an empty string
  • Exits with message wrong type when input is not a string
share|improve this answer

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