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Is it possible to directly access elements of vectors in a data.frame?

# DataFrame
nerv <- data.frame(
    c(letters[1:10]),
    c(1:10)
)

str(nerv)

# Accessing 5th element of the second variable/column
# This should give "5", but it does NOT work
nerv[2][5]

# Works, but I need to know the NAME of the column
nerv$c.1.10.[5]

I tried several things, but none of them worked. I just have the index of the column but not the name, since I want to interate several columns using a loop.

It seems that I have a basic knowledge gap and I hope you can help me to fill it.

Thanks in advance,

Sven

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You want:

> nerv[5,2]
[1] 5

The general pattern is [r, c] where r indexes the rows, and c indexes the columns/variables, that you want to extract. One or both of these can be missing, in which case, it means give me all of the rows/columns that do not have indexes. E.g.

> nerv[, 2] ## all rows, variable 2
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
> nerv[2, ] ## row 2, all variables
  c.letters.1.10.. c.1.10.
2                b       2

Notice that for the first of those, R has dropped the empty dimension resulting in a vector. To suppress this behaviour, add drop = FALSE to the call:

> nerv[, 2, drop = FALSE] ## all rows, variable 2
   c.1.10.
1        1
2        2
3        3
4        4
5        5
6        6
7        7
8        8
9        9
10      10

We can also use the list-style notation in extracting components of the data frame. [ will extract the component (column) as a one-column data frame, whilst [[ will extract the same thing but will drop dimensions. This behaviour comes from the usual behaviour on a list, where [ returns a list, whereas [[ returns the thing inside the indexed component. Some example might help:

> nerv[2]
   c.1.10.
1        1
2        2
3        3
4        4
5        5
6        6
7        7
8        8
9        9
10      10
> nerv[[2]]
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
> nerv[[1:2]]
[1] 2

This also explains why nerv[2][5] failed for you. nerv[2] returns a data frame with a single column, which you then try to retrieve column 5 from.

The details of this are all included in the help file ?Extract.data.frame or ?`[[.data.frame`

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Since a data frame is technically a list, this also works:

nerv[[2]][5]
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try

nerv[5,2]

and...

?'['

This should help fill in your gap a bit.

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I already tried nerv[2,5], but it gives NULL. I also tried things like as.vector(nerv[2])[5] –  R_User Jun 19 '11 at 17:55
1  
That's back to front, rows first, columns second. You both have this the wrong way round. –  Gavin Simpson Jun 19 '11 at 18:06
1  
@Gavin, I'm sure that @John made a typo... [fixed]. –  aL3xa Jun 19 '11 at 18:09
    
@aL3xa whoops sorry, should have grepped that. @John, sorry, didn't mean to be snappy. –  Gavin Simpson Jun 19 '11 at 18:28
    
I'm guessing I did make a typo... :) Thanks aL3xa –  John Jun 19 '11 at 20:17

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