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My database has table name transactions which has 20000 records. When i run this query

SELECT T1.* FROM transactions AS T1
WHERE T1.ppno IN 
  (SELECT T2.PPNO FROM transactions AS T2 
   WHERE T2.ppno = T1.ppno 
   HAVING COUNT(T2.ppno) = $doublescount) 
 ORDER BY T1.ppno,T1.numb

it takes atleast 3 mins to run....How to speed up this query. Plz help

EDIT 1: show create table transactions returns as

CREATE TABLE `transactions` (
  `eidx` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `numb` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `date` date NOT NULL,
  `time` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `add1` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `add2` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `city` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `phno` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `nati` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `ppno` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `cuam` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `tcam` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `valu` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `srch` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `stax` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `taxp` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `roun` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `amnt` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `encd` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `mocd` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `endt` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `modt` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
  `sflg` varchar(5) NOT NULL,
  `category` varchar(45) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'NA',
  `branch` varchar(10) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`numb`,`branch`,`date`) USING BTREE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 ROW_FORMAT=FIXED
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3  
ppno field in both tables are indexes right? –  hexa Jun 19 '11 at 17:59
    
@hexa im not sure....what is indices...very sorry –  Rajasekar Jun 19 '11 at 18:00
    
i meant indexes –  hexa Jun 19 '11 at 18:01
1  
Run a Show Create Table transactions to show the layout and indexes on the table –  datasage Jun 19 '11 at 18:01
    
Might be nice for other people if you make the title a bit more specific –  Arend Jun 19 '11 at 18:03

4 Answers 4

Instead of using IN condition, use LEFT JOIN NULL

http://explainextended.com/2010/05/27/left-join-is-null-vs-not-in-vs-not-exists-nullable-columns/

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The link you give is giving an alternative to using NOT IN, while the TS is using a plain IN. –  Gerben Jun 19 '11 at 18:04

Subqueries are slow. Use a JOIN on a temporary table containing all the ppno's that satisfy the condition.

SELECT T1.* FROM transactions AS T1 
JOIN (SELECT DISTINCT T2.PPNO FROM transactions AS T2 HAVING COUNT(T2.ppno) = $doublescount) AS temp ON temp.PPNO=T1.ppno
ORDER BY T1.ppno,T1.numb
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Right. The issue with the question's query is that it relies on a dependent subquery. This solution turns it into an independent subquery in FROM, which should get much better performance. But for God's sake, please use meaningful aliases instead of T1 and T2. Ugh... –  Romain Sep 30 '11 at 15:41

change the SELECT T1.* FROM transactions AS T1 so it fetches only the columns you need e.g SELECT T1.ppno, T1.name FROM transactions as T1 and then use the join method courtesy of Gerben.

when SELECT * is used, the database system has to work out what columns are in the database, and then allocate memory for each column and row - quite a lot of background work before the query is run. By using named columns, the database system only needs to check those columns - less background work before running the query.

If your query is taking 3mins to execute, you probably have a cartesian join happening, where the result set could potentially run into the millions. gerben's join method prevents this by making a temporary table consisting of the subquery result appended to the main table, the main query is run against this temporary table to produce a much smaller result set.

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He doesn't have a cartesian join, but in this example, running an EXPLAIN <query> on the question's query would show that the IN (SELECT ...) clause results in a dependent subquery, meaning the subquery will be run once per row in the outer query's result, which is terribly inefficient. The Joinsolution will fix this. –  Romain Sep 30 '11 at 15:39

If the bottleneck is the database, you can also leave out the ORDER BY and do the ordering in the application instead of the DB.

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