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This is a bizarre problem. I've got a void function that performs a for loop and nothing else, but the for loop doesn't ever start, even though the function is being called. Here is the function:

void Cell::Consolidate()
{
    cout << "Consolidating (outside)...\n";
    for(int i = 0; i < m_Tiles.size(); ++i)
    {
        cout << "Consolidating (inside)...\n";
        int row = m_Tiles[i]->GetRow();
        int col = m_Tiles[i]->GetCol();
        //Check below.
        if((*m_pTileMap)[row + 1][col].pParentCell != this)
        {
            m_EdgeTiles.push_back(m_Tiles[i]);
            m_Tiles[i]->SetColor(sf::Color(100, 100, 100));
            bool newNeighbor = true;
            for(int j = 0; j < m_Neighbors.size(); ++j)
            {
                if(m_Neighbors[j] == (*m_pTileMap)[row + 1][col].pParentCell)
                {
                    newNeighbor = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if(newNeighbor)
            {
                m_Neighbors.push_back((*m_pTileMap)[row + 1][col].pParentCell);
            }
        }
        //Check above.
        else if((*m_pTileMap)[row - 1][col].pParentCell != this)
        {
            m_EdgeTiles.push_back(m_Tiles[i]);
            m_Tiles[i]->SetColor(sf::Color(100, 100, 100));
            bool newNeighbor = true;
            for(int j = 0; j < m_Neighbors.size(); ++j)
            {
                if(m_Neighbors[j] == (*m_pTileMap)[row - 1][col].pParentCell)
                {
                    newNeighbor = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if(newNeighbor)
            {
                m_Neighbors.push_back((*m_pTileMap)[row - 1][col].pParentCell);
            }
        }
        //Check the right.
        else if((*m_pTileMap)[row][col + 1].pParentCell != this)
        {
            m_EdgeTiles.push_back(m_Tiles[i]);
            m_Tiles[i]->SetColor(sf::Color(100, 100, 100));
            bool newNeighbor = true;
            for(int j = 0; j < m_Neighbors.size(); ++j)
            {
                if(m_Neighbors[j] == (*m_pTileMap)[row][col + 1].pParentCell)
                {
                    newNeighbor = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if(newNeighbor)
            {
                m_Neighbors.push_back((*m_pTileMap)[row][col + 1].pParentCell);
            }
        }
        //Check the left.
        else if((*m_pTileMap)[row][col - 1].pParentCell != this)
        {
            m_EdgeTiles.push_back(m_Tiles[i]);
            m_Tiles[i]->SetColor(sf::Color(100, 100, 100));
            bool newNeighbor = true;
            for(int j = 0; j < m_Neighbors.size(); ++j)
            {
                if(m_Neighbors[j] == (*m_pTileMap)[row][col - 1].pParentCell)
                {
                    newNeighbor = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if(newNeighbor)
            {
                m_Neighbors.push_back((*m_pTileMap)[row][col - 1].pParentCell);
            }
        }
    }
}

When I run the program, "Consolidating (outside)...\n" gets send to cout, but "Consolidating (inside)...\n" does not. Nothing that is supposed to happen in the loop actually happens, either (for example the SetColor() calls don't do anything, nor does anything happen if I send things to cout anywhere else in the loop), so I can only assume the loop is not starting at all. Why not? What could cause this?

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1  
What prevents you from Debugging the code and analyze what's happening? –  Ajay Jun 19 '11 at 19:03
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
i < m_Tiles.size()

This loop condition gets checked on entrance to the loop, not only after each iteration. If your m_Tiles vector is empty, well, no loop for you.

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Darn... that means the problem is somewhere else. I need to pay more attention when porting my Python code to C++. Shame, I thought I had stumbled across some deep, esoteric idiosyncrasy of C++. :P –  GarrickW Jun 19 '11 at 18:24
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Most likely, m_Tiles.size() returns a negative value or zero value.

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3  
What's a negative size? It's 0, if anything. –  Cat Plus Plus Jun 19 '11 at 18:24
1  
If it's a personal crafted class, it is possible. –  AdrianMar Jun 19 '11 at 18:25
1  
No, negative size never makes any sense. –  Cat Plus Plus Jun 19 '11 at 18:27
1  
I will kill anyone who returns a negative value for something that represents size. Thought I'd put that nicely. –  Marlon Jun 19 '11 at 18:27
1  
@Marlon: Just demand a size_t for anything that represents a size, can't get negative. :) –  Xeo Jun 19 '11 at 18:34
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