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I'm new to developing stored procedures so in my attempt I got a bit mind-boggled. I understand basically what they are conceptually, but having issues when implementing. For reference, I'm hand-coding, but intend to use SQL Server, ASP.NET, and C# technologies.

The basic idea is for a user to create their own user account, update their information as they see fit, delete their account, and authenticate the information as necessary (usernames&passwords, account information, etc). I presume this must be done with 4 different stored procedures: createAccount, modAccount, delAccount, authentAccount.

My understanding is that the C#/ASP should be doing the actual data collection and then transferring the data to SQL for insertion into the database. Please correct me if I'm wrong or if there's a more efficient method (speed is extremely important for this).

Getting started with the first stored procedure (create), I coded this:

CREATE PROC createAccount
AS
INSERT INTO Customer (cssn, first_name, middle_name, last_name, company, address, phone_number, email, account, occupation, nationality, social, successful_invites)
VALUES ()
GO

What do I put in for values? The variable that's used on the C# side?

I'm also not sure how I should incorporate security in this space and security is going to be important as well.

If you could provide examples with your explanation, that would be EXTREMELY helpful.

share|improve this question
    
Not to sound harsh, but why don't you try to learn the basics first and then ask more specific questions later? There are hundreds of tutorials out there (such as sql-server-performance.com/2003/stored-procedures-basics, csharp-station.com/Tutorials/AdoDotNet/Lesson07.aspx, and others) that might be more helpful to you than the 5-line comments you can expect here. – matk Jun 20 '11 at 8:30

Here's the basic form of your SP (first 3 columns shown):

create procedure createAccount
(
    @cssn varchar(100), 
    @first_name varchar(100), 
    @last_name  varchar(100), 
    ...  -- remaining columns
) 
as
begin
    insert into Customer (cssn, first_name, last_name, ... )
    values (@cssn, @first_name, @last_name, ... )
end
share|improve this answer

One side note, ASP has user accounts built in and set up automatically if you want to just use those (SqlMembershipProvider).

CREATE PROCEDURE createAccount
    @cssn VARCHAR(100)
    , @first_name VARCHAR(100)
    , @middle_name VARCHAR(100)
    , @last_name VARCHAR(100)
    , @company VARCHAR(100)
    , @address VARCHAR(150)
    , @phone_number VARCHAR(20)
    , @email VARCHAR(100)
    , @account VARCHAR(100)
    , @occupation VARCHAR(100)
    , @nationality VARCHAR(100)
    , @social VARCHAR(100)
    , @successful_invites INT
AS
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO Customer ( cssn, first_name, middle_name, last_name, company, address, phone_number, email, account, occupation, nationality, social, successful_invites )
    VALUES ( @cssn, @first_name, @middle_name, @last_name, @company, @address, @phone_number, @email, @account, @occupation, @nationality, @social, @successful_invites )
END

I just guessed at the data types. As for security, the only thing you need to add is re-validation rules (i.e. blocking of HTML tags and stuff in your VARCHAR fields). Otherwise, security is built-in automatically because you are using parameters and variables (and not using dynamic sql).

share|improve this answer

If you want to use SqlMembershipProvider, you have already in asp.net a set of controls that will help you. You may have to use their tables and not your Customer table, but that is ok since the membership provider will take care of everything. Just google for more info about membership provider and the login controls.

You have in other answers examples of stored procedures, but why using stored procedures? An ORM is a much easier and more productive way of doing things. My favorite is NHiberntate. LINQ to SQL, Entity Framework are from Microsoft. Just google for a "linq to sql hello world" to see how it's done.

In 99.99% of the cases an ORM is just fine.There are rare cases when you need to replace the ORM with a sql query or sp.

share|improve this answer

Stored procedures are nice ways to store SQL scripts in a central location among other things. That's the basic, most simplest concept. If you have a script in your code with (update TABLE set EMAIL = '"+email+"'), you're better off putting into a stored procedure. You can even do additions and updates in the same procedure returning the ID of the existing/updated or newly created record. You can get VERY creative with them.

You can do updates and additions in the same procedure if it's secure of course.

create usp_AddEmail(
    @email varchar(50)
)
AS
    DECLARE @EMAILID INT;
    SET @EMAILID = (SELECT ID FROM TABLE WHERE EMAIL = @EMAIL);
    IF ISNULL(@EMAILID,0) = 0
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO TABLE(EMAIL) VALUES(@email);
        SET @EMAILID = (SELECT ID FROM TABLE WHERE EMAIL = @EMAIL);
    END
    SELECT @EMAILID AS EMAILID

In C#, you use CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure to let it know it's a stored procedure. Then you use .Parameters.AddWithValue(sqlParameter, value) to pass the value. (You can wrap it into a method):

SqlConnection connLoc = new SqlConnection(YourConnectionSring);
SqlCommand commLoc = new SqlCommand();
SqlDataReader drLoc;

commLoc.Connection = connLoc;
commLoc.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
commLoc.CommandText = "usp_AddEmail";
commLoc.Parameters.AddWithValue(@email, emailString);
connLoc.Open();
drLoc = commLoc.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);
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