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This is my code

    char *c[strlen(a) + strlen(b) + 2];
    strcat(c, a);
    strcat(c, "+");
    strcat(c, b);

The resulting string c has some junk characters in the beginning, followed by the concatenated string. What did I do wrong?

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You've got two problems, the answers so far each manage to identify just one. (Makes me wish I'd finished typing my answer that hit both!) –  Arthur Shipkowski Jun 20 '11 at 2:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
char c[strlen(a) + strlen(b) + 2];
snprintf(c, sizeof(c), "%s+%s", a, b);
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It should be:

char *c = malloc (sizeof (char) * (strlen (a) + strlen (b) + 2));
c[0] = '\0';
strcat(c, a);
strcat(c, "+");
strcat(c, b);

The cause of the failure of your routine is because you have done :

char *c[strlen(a) + strlen (b) + 2];

which declare c as an array of pointers, and also not initialized the array with a '\0'. It should be like

char c[strlen(a) + strlen (b) + 2];

You also have to initialize the array with a null string, as strcat would find the '\0' at the time of concatenation.

Note that there is no problem in execution in error in char *c[strlen(a) + strlen (b) + 2]; as each location would have 4 bytes in length, so the array can accommodate the characters in it. But this is not correct.

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2  
Correct declaration, but that first strcat will still be problematic. –  Arthur Shipkowski Jun 20 '11 at 2:19
    
This probably isn't downvote worthy, but this does not get to the heart of the problem here. This justs allocates memory on the heap for the string instead of using the stack like s/he wants. –  darren Jun 20 '11 at 2:20
    
@Arthur, agreed should do a memset() before starting the strcat; OR could do a snprintf(). –  Suroot Jun 20 '11 at 2:21
    
@Suroot, I'd do an strncpy() for the first strcat, myself -- but your solutions work too. Perl isn't the only TMTOWTDI language! –  Arthur Shipkowski Jun 20 '11 at 2:23

If you don't have initialize c[0] = '\0';, strcat will seek until the first '\0' before inserting into c.

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Correct strcat usage, but the variable declaration will still be problematic. –  Arthur Shipkowski Jun 20 '11 at 2:19
    
@Arthur, true that. –  John Percival Hackworth Jun 20 '11 at 2:21

You're declaring an array of pointers to char (char *). You need to declare an array of char:

char c[strlen(a) + strlen(b) + 2];
strcat(c, a);
strcat(c, "+");
strcat(c, b);
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Your junk characters are coming from c, you are defining c but it's poiting to some junk value because you haven't initialized them, assign the first character of c to be null, I think that should fix your problem..

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