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I'm trying to convert 4 bytes into a 32 bit unsigned integer.

I thought maybe something like:

UInt32 combined = (UInt32)((map[i] << 32) | (map[i+1] << 24) | (map[i+2] << 16) | (map[i+3] << 8));

But this doesn't seem to be working. What am I missing?

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3 Answers

Your shifts are all off by 8. Shift by 24, 16, 8, and 0.

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Is that the only thing wrong with it? –  Pocki Jun 20 '11 at 2:29
    
Assuming you choose to stick with the math rather than delegate, yes. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 20 '11 at 2:31
    
@Ignacio, the confusing part for me is that I'm shifting a byte more positions than it has. So, why does shifting a byte 24 positions work? It isn't cast to the 32bit int until after all the shifts. –  Pocki Jun 20 '11 at 2:32
1  
The byte's value occupies bits 1 through 8. You want to shift it 24 bits so it occupies bits 24 through 32. If you shift if 32 bits, it goes off the end into oblivion. –  Joel B Fant Jun 20 '11 at 2:34
    
The compiler is aware of that. But it's still performing the operation in 32 bits, regardless of the size of the left operand. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 20 '11 at 2:35
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Use the BitConverter class.

Specifically, this overload.

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and.. the reason you would use this over manual shifts is because if my C# code were to ever be compiled on an architecture with a different endianess than it would still work? –  Pocki Jun 20 '11 at 2:58
    
@Pocki: No, bit-shifting will always work the same way, no matter which order the actual bytes themselves are stored in memory. << always shifts bits "higher", and >> shifts them "lower". –  Joel B Fant Jun 20 '11 at 3:10
    
@Pocki: Yes, the conversion is endian-specific. There is a system-specific flag that the class uses to adjust the conversion. The relevant code looks like this: if (IsLittleEndian) { return (((numRef[0] | (numRef[1] << 8)) | (numRef[2] << 0x10)) | (numRef[3] << 0x18)); } return ((((numRef[0] << 0x18) | (numRef[1] << 0x10)) | (numRef[2] << 8)) | numRef[3]); –  Robert Harvey Jun 20 '11 at 5:38
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BitConverter.ToInt32()

You can always do something like this:

public static unsafe int ToInt32(byte[] value, int startIndex)
{
    fixed (byte* numRef = &(value[startIndex]))
    {
        if ((startIndex % 4) == 0)
        {
            return *(((int*)numRef));
        }
        if (IsLittleEndian)
        {
            return (((numRef[0] | (numRef[1] << 8)) | (numRef[2] << 0x10)) | (numRef[3] << 0x18));
        }
        return ((((numRef[0] << 0x18) | (numRef[1] << 0x10)) | (numRef[2] << 8)) | numRef[3]);
    }
}

But this would be reinventing the wheel, as this is actually how BitConverter.ToInt32() is implemented.

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