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In C#, using .NET Framework 4, is there an elegant way to repeat the same action a determined number of times? For example, instead of:

int repeat = 10;
for (int i = 0; i < repeat; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hello World.");
    this.DoSomeStuff();
}

I would like to write something like:

Action toRepeat = () =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hello World.");
    this.DoSomeStuff();
};

toRepeat.Repeat(10);

or:

Enumerable.Repeat(10, () =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hello World.");
    this.DoSomeStuff();
});

I know I can create my own extension method for the first example, but isn't there an existent feature which makes it already possible to do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There is no built-in way to do this.

The reason is that C# as it is tries to enforce a divide between the functional and imperative sides of the language. C# only makes it easy to do functional programming when it is not going to produce side effects. Thus you get collection-manipulation methods like LINQ's Where, Select, etc., but you do not get ForEach.1

In a similar way, what you are trying to do here is find some functional way of expressing what is essentially an imperative action. Although C# gives you the tools to do this, it does not try to make it easy for you, as doing so makes your code unclear and non-idiomatic.

1 There is a List<T>.ForEach, but not an IEnumerable<T>.ForEach. I would say the existence of List<T>.ForEach is a historical artifact stemming from the framework designers not having thought through these issues around the time of .NET 2.0; the need for a clear division only became apparent in 3.0.

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3  
Of course, nothing stops you from writing your own side-effect-ridden Repeat or ForEach method on IEnumerable - the language designers have washed their hands by that point. –  geofftnz Jun 20 '11 at 4:38
    
Can I ask why using the ForEach as an example, is such a bad thing? –  CodeBlend Jun 21 '13 at 15:34

Like this?

Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ForEach(arg => toRepeat());

This will execute your method 10 times.

[Edit]

I am so used to having ForEach extension method on Enumerable, that I forgot it is not part of FCL.

public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Action<T> action)
{
    foreach (var item in source)
        action(item);
}

Here is what you can do without ForEach extension method:

Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ToList().ForEach(arg => toRepeat());

[Edit]

I think that the most elegant solution is to implement reusable method:

public static void RepeatAction(int repeatCount, Action action)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < repeatCount; i++)
        action();
}

Usage:

RepeatAction(10, () => { Console.WriteLine("Hello World."); });
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ForEach is not an extension method on IEnumerable<int>. You may be thinking of the method List<T>.ForEach. –  Domenic Jun 20 '11 at 4:17
    
@Domenic - good catch. I actually checked the code and it compiled, but this was because I have my version of ForEach implementation for IEnumerable. –  Alex Aza Jun 20 '11 at 4:22
    
Now it won't let me undo my -1... X_x. EDIT: OK I fixed a typo and now it will let me undo it, all good now. –  Domenic Jun 20 '11 at 4:22

Without rolling out your own extension, I guess you can do something like this

    Action toRepeat = () => {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello World.");
         this.DoSomeStuff();
    };

    int repeat = 10;
    Enumerable.Range(0, repeat).ToList().ForEach(i => toRepeat());
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For brevity of a one liner you could do this. Not sure what you think...

Enumerable.Repeat<Action>(() => 
{
    Console.WriteLine("Hello World.");
    this.DoSomeStuff();
}, 10).ToList().ForEach(x => x());
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o think this is not elegant. This is less readable and harder to understand than a simple for statement. –  Ewerton Oct 26 '12 at 17:02

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