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I have a media table and a tag_media table. The tag_media table is a relationship table that contains the columns id_tag and id_media. A single media file can be tagged with multiple tags. Something like:

tag_media:
    id_tag
    id_media

media:
    id_media
    (etc, etc)

I need a query that will allow me to fetch all media that was tagged with a set of mandatory tags and a set of optional tags so that I can guarantee that the returned media were tagged with ALL the mandatory tags and AT LEAST one of the optional tags.

How can I do this?

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I'm doing this in code right now as that's my forte. Basically getting the mandatory tags from MySQL and checking the optional ones one by one in code. –  Julian Jun 20 '11 at 4:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
SELECT m.*
FROM media m
  INNER JOIN (
    SELECT id_media
    FROM tag_media
    GROUP BY id_media
    HAVING COUNT(id_tag IN (required1, required2) OR NULL) = 2
       AND COUNT(id_tag IN (option1, option2, option3) OR NULL) >= 1
  ) t ON m.id_media = t.id_media

This assumes that one media item cannot have duplicate tags.

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@Andriy is Count(Column IN (ValueList)) special MySQL syntax that treats the result of boolean expressions as countable? And how does the OR NULL come into play? –  ErikE Jun 20 '11 at 20:12
    
@ErikE: Boolean expressions are countable in MySQL, yes, as well as summable. Not sure whether MySQL is unique in that regard. As for the OR NULL bit, COUNT, as it is well known, counts any value and doesn't count NULLs. A boolean, whether 'true' or 'false', is a value, but we only need to count the occurrences of 'true'. With OR NULL we are taking advantage of MySQL's shortcut evaluation of boolean expressions. You can read more about it here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5011239/… –  Andriy M Jun 20 '11 at 20:49
    
Thanks for translating my query into MySQL specific syntax. :-p –  ErikE Jun 20 '11 at 22:08
    
@Julian There are a couple of problems with this query as it is now. First of all, it doesn't restrict to only the interesting tags, so if there can be a lot of tags and there are proper indexes this will hurt the performance. Second, using Sum instead of Count will let you drop OR NULL. Please see my answer. –  ErikE Jun 20 '11 at 22:13
    
@ErikE: Always welcome. :) I didn't actually. When I was posting my solution, I couldn't see yours around yet. –  Andriy M Jun 20 '11 at 22:14

This query will do what you are looking for:

SELECT
   M.id_media
FROM
   media M
   INNER JOIN tag_media T ON M.id_media = T.id_media
WHERE T.id_tag IN ('required1', 'required2', ... 'optional1', 'optional2', ...)
GROUP BY M.id_media
HAVING
   Sum(T.id_tag IN ('required1', ... 'requiredn')) = <n>
      -- where n is the required number of tags
   AND Sum(T.id_tag IN ('optional1', ... 'optionaln')) >= 1

I prefer constructions like this, though, because then the information is listed only once:

SELECT
   M.id_media
FROM
   media M
   INNER JOIN tag_media T ON M.id_media = T.id_media
   INNER JOIN (
      SELECT 'required1' id_tag, 1 required UNION ALL SELECT 'required2', 1 ...
      UNION ALL SELECT 'optional1', 0 UNION ALL SELECT 'optional2', 0
   ) S ON T.id_tag = S.id_tag
GROUP BY M.id_media
HAVING
   Sum(required) = <n> -- where n is the required number of tags
   AND Sum(1 - required) >= 1

And if you can use CTEs in MySQL, then converting the S derived table to a CTE (or putting it in a temp table) will let you change <n> from the literal number of required options to (SELECT Count(*) from S).

Note: technically, these queries can be rewritten to be entirely against the tag_media table. But if you want to pull other information from the media table, then this is how you'd probably do it.

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nice query but shouldn't it be without the GROUP BY? –  Abhay Jun 20 '11 at 7:50
    
nah, my bad :-) –  Abhay Jun 20 '11 at 8:29
    
The second solution does have a couple of issues. First, I'm not sure aliasing like table_alias (column_aliases) will work in MySQL (couldn't find it in the documentation and don't have MySQL to verify). And second, you've got no join condition after the subselect. That wouldn't produce any errors, only you should know that INNER JOIN and CROSS JOIN are synonyms in MySQL: without a condition it's a cross join essentially, otherwise it's an inner join. –  Andriy M Jun 21 '11 at 4:32
    
Thank you @Andriy, good catch. Is that better? –  ErikE Jun 21 '11 at 5:07
    
+1 Seems fine, should work correctly in MySQL anyway. –  Andriy M Jun 21 '11 at 7:38

This should also work (based on ALL and IN keyword):

SELECT `M`.`id_media`
FROM `media` `M`
INNER JOIN `tag_media` `TM` ON `M`.`id_media` = `TM`.`id_media`
WHERE `TM`.`id_tag` = ALL ('required_tag_1', 'required_tag_2', 'required_tag_3')
AND `TM`.`id_tag` IN ('optional_tag_1', 'optional_tag_2', 'optional_tag_3');
share|improve this answer

Create an exists clause for all mandatory tags and check against the total by counting and one exists for all not mandatory

SELECT id_media 
FROM media
WHERE EXISTS
(SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM tag_media
WHERE  tag_media.id_media IN (mandatory1, mandatory2, ...)
AND media.id = tag_media.media_id -- Comment: Used to join with the outer table
GROUP BY id_media
HAVING COUNT(*)>= n -- the required tag total
)
AND
EXISTS
(SELECT *
FROM tag_media
WHERE  tag_media.id_media IN (NotMandatory1, NotMandatory2, NotMandatory3)
AND media.id = tag_media.media_id
)
share|improve this answer
    
I could not recommend a query that has to change depending on the quantity of mandatory items... –  ErikE Jun 20 '11 at 20:13
    
ErikE do you read all the answers? I really cannot understand the negative point obsession with my answers. –  niktrs Jun 20 '11 at 20:26
    
I'm sorry niktrs, I don't remember your name. Have I voted your answers down more than once? Sorry about that. I only vote down with a comment explaining why, and never for personal reasons, and I always remove the downvote if the problem I mentioned is later fixed (if I'm properly tagged so I get notified). I did read all the answers. Downvotes are not just absolute measures but also help answers float up or down in the stack. Abhay's answer (while I don't understand the MySQL specific syntax) looks to meet the requirements better, so your post needed to move down in the stack. –  ErikE Jun 20 '11 at 22:01
    
No bad feelings :) . Changed it since i liked the count(*) idea. Check again –  niktrs Jun 21 '11 at 5:07
    
Not sure about the tags table you introduced. Also I've gotten strange results in SQL Server with aggregates in exists clauses, I hope it works in MySQL. And I think you don't need Count in the SELECT clause, just SELECT 1 should do. You might not even need GROUP BY, not sure. Also... how am I getting tagged without an explicit tag? Did the functionality change? –  ErikE Jun 21 '11 at 5:11

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