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In Generics FAQ: Best Practices says :

The compiler will let you explicitly cast generic type parameters to any interface, but not to a class:

interface ISomeInterface
{...}
class SomeClass
{...}
class MyClass<T> 
{
   void SomeMethod(T t)
   {
      ISomeInterface obj1 = (ISomeInterface)t;//Compiles
      SomeClass      obj2 = (SomeClass)t;     //Does not compile
   }
}

I see limitation reasonable for both, classes and interfaces, unless the class/interface is not specified as constraint type.

So why such behavior, why it is allowed for interfaces ?

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ooh a clr question. where's john skeet. –  nathan gonzalez Jun 20 '11 at 5:16
1  
@nathan - I think you mean Eric Lippert... –  Oded Jun 20 '11 at 5:18
    
Just to note that the article linked is from 2005 - Generics have changed since. –  Oded Jun 20 '11 at 5:20
    
Yes, it can happen to be changed. Even so, what was the idea behind ? What makes compiler assume that generic type can be casted to any interface ? –  Incognito Jun 20 '11 at 5:21
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2 Answers

I believe this is because the cast to SomeClass can mean any number of things depending on what conversions are available, whereas the cast to ISomeInterface can only be a reference conversion or a boxing conversion.

Options:

  • Cast to object first:

    SomeClass obj2 = (SomeClass) (object) t;
    
  • Use as instead:

    SomeClass obj2 = t as SomeClass;
    

Obviously in the second case you would also need to perform a nullity check afterwards in case t is not a SomeClass.

EDIT: The reasoning for this is given in section 6.2.7 of the C# 4 specification:

The above rules do not permit a direct explicit conversion from an unconstrained type parameter to a non-interface type, which might be surprising. The reason for this rule is to prevent confusion and make the semantics of such conversions clear. For example, consider the following declaration:

class X<T>
{
    public static long F(T t) {
        return (long)t; // Error 
    }
} 

If the direct explicit conversion of t to int were permitted, one might easily expect that X<int>.F(7) would return 7L. However, it would not, because the standard numeric conversions are only considered when the types are known to be numeric at binding-time. In order to make the semantics clear, the above example must instead be written:

class X<T>
{
    public static long F(T t) {
        return (long)(object)t; // Ok, but will only work when T is long
    }
}

This code will now compile but executing X<int>.F(7) would then throw an exception at run-time, since a boxed int cannot be converted directly to a long.

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If this is the case than shouldn't it work with class constraint ? –  Incognito Jun 20 '11 at 5:48
    
@Incognito: No, I don't believe so. I don't know the details of why the direct conversion is prohibited, but the cast to object first shouldn't actually add any performance penalty. –  Jon Skeet Jun 20 '11 at 5:58
    
Be aware that you WILL get a runtime error if you cast to object first and the type "T" is not castable as "SomeClass". So unless you really have a reason to do that, I would avoid that at all cost. –  Xenophile Jun 20 '11 at 5:59
    
@Xenophile: That's precisely why I would typically prefer the cast over using as - to spot errors earlier. There's nothing specific to generics about that, of course. –  Jon Skeet Jun 20 '11 at 6:00
    
@Jon yes it is possible to have casting using intermediate object instance. This is the practical solution for the current situation. Personally I am more interested not in the solution, but in the inner reasons, why and what. –  Incognito Jun 20 '11 at 6:02
show 3 more comments

In the inheritance principle of C#, interfaces could be inherited multiple times, but a class just once. As the inheritance from interfaces has complex hierarchy, the .net framework does not need to ensure the generic type T a specific interface at the compile time.(EDIT) On the contrary, a class could be ensured a specific class with declaring a type constraint at the compile as the following code.

class MyClass<T> where T : SomeClass
{
   void SomeMethod(T t)
   {
      ISomeInterface obj1 = (ISomeInterface)t;
      SomeClass      obj2 = (SomeClass)t;     
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer makes it sound like you believe a constraint of where T : ISomeInterface would be invalid... it wouldn't. –  Jon Skeet Jun 20 '11 at 5:59
    
@Jon Skeet: It would be thought like you mentioned, so I edited. –  Jin-Wook Chung Jun 20 '11 at 6:10
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