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i know, that i should utilize htmlAgilityPack - but in my case, i do not have any chance for that ... sad but true ...
we have following regex: <a(.+?)(href=["|'](.+?)["|'])(.+?)>(.+?)</a> and following sample input:

<A href="
http://dummy.domain/dummy.html
" target="_blank"><b><font face="Arial" color="#0000FF" size="2">
Dummy text
</font></b></a>

if i remove the line-breaks inside the groups, everything works fine. i'm running on this on .net c# with ignore-case-option.

does . not capture any \r\n-things?

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5  
DOTALL MODE –  Prince John Wesley Jun 20 '11 at 5:57
    
@John: you should make that an answer (for accepting), or join me on my close :) –  Andreas Niedermair Jun 20 '11 at 6:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm guessing you placed the pipe symbol to signify "OR" in the character class--if that is the case, remove the pipes, the [] implies an "OR" of any of its members.

Also, remember that there's the possibility of \n anywhere within the HTML, and "." won't catch those characters (it will catch \r).

To match newlines, you'll need to either use the SingleLine option, or change the . to an alternative such as [.\n] or [\s\S] in place of the plain .. Here's an example with the singleline mode specified inline:

(?s)<a(.+?)(href=["'](.+?)["'])([^>]*)>(.+?)</a>

Note also the [^>]* used here, it's a little simpler than using the non-greedy match.

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well, actually it does ... the regex is correct, but i have to use the singleline-option to catch \n... –  Andreas Niedermair Jun 20 '11 at 6:02
    
Right you are! My bad. Edited to include details on whitespace and "." –  richardtallent Jun 20 '11 at 6:06

If you just trying to select everything in between the tags try this

<a\b[^>]*>([\s\S.]*?)</a>
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actually, i'm not doing a dumb-select here :) ... the groups need to remain as they are. sry ... –  Andreas Niedermair Jun 20 '11 at 6:10
    
one thing to notice: the execution time of [\s\S] is really bad, compared to . :) –  Andreas Niedermair Jun 20 '11 at 7:06
    
it is ugly, \S = selects everything but white space \s = white space, misses from memory, so probably not the best choice, but it does grab everything :) –  Mark Jun 20 '11 at 7:23

If I'm not mistaken, the . matches any character except a newline.

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actually, i guessed so ... if you add a solution, i would like to tick your answer as correct! –  Andreas Niedermair Jun 20 '11 at 6:02

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