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Ok, so on a web page, I've got a JavaScript object which I'm using as an associative array. This exists statically in a script block when the page loads:

var salesWeeks = {
    "200911" : ["11 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200910" : ["10 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200909" : ["09 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200908" : ["08 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200907" : ["07 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200906" : ["06 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200905" : ["05 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200904" : ["04 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200903" : ["03 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200902" : ["02 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200901" : ["01 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200852" : ["52 / 2008", "Fiscal 2009"],
    "200851" : ["51 / 2008", "Fiscal 2009"]
};

The order of the key/value pairs is intentional, as I'm turning the object into an HTML select box such as this:

<select id="ddl_sw" name="ddl_sw">
<option value="">== SELECT WEEK ==</option>
<option value="200911">11 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200910">10 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200909">09 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200908">08 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200907">07 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200906">06 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200905">05 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200904">04 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200903">03 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200902">02 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200901">01 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200852">52 / 2008 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200851">51 / 2008 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
</select>

...with code that looks like this (snipped from a function):

var arr = [];
arr.push(
    "<select id=\"ddl_sw\" name=\"ddl_sw\">" +
    "<option value=\"\">== SELECT WEEK ==</option>"
);

for(var key in salesWeeks)
{
    arr.push(
    	"<option value=\"" + key + "\">" +
    	salesWeeks[key][0] + " (" + salesWeeks[key][1] + ")" +
    	"<\/option>"
    );
}

arr.push("<\/select>");

return arr.join("");

This all works fine in IE, FireFox and Opera.

However in Chrome, the order comes out all weird:

<select id="ddl_sw" name="ddl_sw">
<option value="">== SELECT WEEK ==</option>
<option value="200852">52 / 2008 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200908">08 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200906">06 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200902">02 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200907">07 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200904">04 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200909">09 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200903">03 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200905">05 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200901">01 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200910">10 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200911">11 / 2009 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
<option value="200851">51 / 2008 (Fiscal 2009)</option>
</select>

NOTE: This order, though weird, does not change on subsequent refreshes. It's always in this order.

So, what is Chrome doing? Some optimization in how it processes the loop?

In the first place, am I wrong to rely on the order that the key/value pairs are declared in any associative array?

I never questioned it before, I just assumed the order would hold because this technique has always worked for me in the other browsers. But I suppose I've never seen it stated anywhere that the order is guaranteed. Maybe it's not?

Any insight would be awesome. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
There's no such thing as an "associative array" in javaScript! –  James Mar 12 '09 at 22:57
1  
Of course there is, a js object is simply an associative array, or a map, or a dictionary. –  Juan Mendes Apr 27 '10 at 14:27
    
Is this only chrome - or WebKit in general? Does the same bug happen on safari? –  gnarf May 24 '10 at 21:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Think of an associative array as a paper sack into which all the key-value pairs are placed. As you reach your hand into the sack to look at the pairs (such as with the for...in loop), the order that you encounter them is for all practical purposes random.

If you want to see them in a specific order, you'll need to extract the keys into an array and sort it. Then walk across the array, using the keys you encounter to index into the associative array.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, I was doing exactly that while watching this thread for a response :) I wasn't sure whether this was the case, but I had a feeling. Thanks! –  Jerry Mar 12 '09 at 22:48
2  
All browsers other than chrome do property iteration in the order of insertion, so you should file a bug on chrome/v8 for not doing so. –  olliej Mar 12 '09 at 23:25
8  
Chrome is correct; the actual spec says that order is not preserved. –  Chase Seibert Mar 13 '09 at 13:44
    
Chrome probably uses a data structure that doesn't keep its elements sorted (like a hash table). –  Brendan Long May 24 '10 at 21:37
3  
I wonder how they expect us to order the list if we can't rely on the order of insertion. I can see where having them ordered by ID is more efficient (binary search). But I still need my list of user IDs ordered by name dang it! –  RandomInsano Jul 23 '10 at 21:45

The order in which elements are stored in an associative array is not guaranteed. You'll have to sort your output explicitly.

share|improve this answer

As the other answers say, the order in which an object's properties are iterated is not defined in the spec, even though the major browsers all iterate them in the defined order.

Chrome will enumerate them in order too, if all of the object's properties contain primitive values. John Resig gives more detail on Chrome's behavior here (under "for loop order"): http://ejohn.org/blog/javascript-in-chrome/

share|improve this answer
    
Good point - I was wondering whether the behavior would differ had I not been storing reference objects as the values. Thanks for the link. –  Jerry Mar 13 '09 at 17:52
    
That article says "However, specification is quite different from implementation. All modern implementations of ECMAScript iterate through object properties in the order in which they were defined. Because of this the Chrome team has deemed this to be a bug and will be fixing it." I like that –  Juan Mendes Apr 27 '10 at 14:37

As pointed out Chrome's behaviour is perfectly valid.

This is a good case of where some OO thinking can help. Do you really want an associative array or just a list of objects?

var salesWeeks = [
    ["200911", "11 / 2009", "Fiscal 2009"],
    ...
]
...
for(var key in salesWeeks)
{
    arr.push(
        "<option value=\"" + salesWeeks[key][0] + "\">" +
        salesWeeks[key][1] + " (" + salesWeeks[key][2] + ")" +
        "<\/option>"
    );
}

would serve you better I think (to those that advocated some form of sort, the order is already defined - why do you want to do extra work?)

share|improve this answer
    
Don't use for...in for arrays. Aside from the fact that "all enumerable properties" and "all array elements" are not necessarily the same, it has the same problems as it does for objects (that is, the order of iteration is not specified), since array indexes are really just properties of an object. –  cHao May 30 '12 at 19:23
    
@cHao - You are indeed right. In composing this response I was focused on restructuring the data and omitted actually fixing the problem :) I do think the restructuring is an improvement on the original code though. –  CurtainDog Jun 9 '12 at 6:51

@curtainDog: NO! NO! Using “for .. in” with Array objects in JavaScript is bad - the entire point of most of the the responses here is that “for .. in” does not guarantee any order. Moreover, “for .. in” will grab properties from an object’s constructor’s prototype and will not iterate over nonexistent keys.

@Samnan: The spec simply says that iteration order is not guaranteed; this means that browsers are free to iterate in sorted order, in order of insertion, in random order, or however else they may. It’s just like a hash table - think of it as random, even if it happens to come out in some apparent order.

I’m fairly sure most browsers look for “for..in” with Array objects and iterate in numeric order so that things don’t break; however, it’s not really doing what most people who use it that way think it’s doing, and it should be avoided unless you specifically need object-type iteration.

share|improve this answer

It's not a real good practice but...

If you add a space to the value chrome will not consider value a number and won't sort them by value.

Example:

<select>
  <option value=" 3">Third</option>
  <option value=" 1">First</option>
  <option value=" 2">Second</option>
</select>

The good side is that you have not to add and then remove alphabetic characters from ID like someone suggested (don't remember if in this or other post with similar question), you could easily trim it but most of the times the space is just ignored and if you post or get those to another file they will simply see the integer value not the space.

share|improve this answer

Contrary to all the other answers, it is CERTAINLY A BUG IN CHROME

The reason:

If the data structure is a paper sack like Barry said then:

The values should always be randimized. This is not the case in chrome

If the data structure is sequential then:

The values should be in the sequence in which they are added to the structure

While other browsers follow the second approach, chrome follows neither and there is still no explanation of what is the sorting order chrome makes up for the data structure while it is accessed.

share|improve this answer
    
They could be pulled out in any order the browser feels like. If it wants to go through them in order... whatever order that may be...it's free to do so. If it wants to go through them at random...again, that's its choice, and is compliant with the ECMAScript specs. The whole point is that the implementation can iterate however it pleases, and need not even tell you what order or why it chose such an order, because properties do not have an intrinsic "order" to them. If you care about order, do not use for...in. –  cHao May 30 '12 at 19:36

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