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I am using C# with jQuery to validate a bunch of emails entered into a form.

public const string Email = "^([a-zA-Z0-9_\\\\-\\\\.]+)@((\\\\[[0-9]{1,3}\\\\.[0-9]{1,3}\\\\.[0-9]{1,3}\\\\.)|(([a-zA-Z0-9\\\\-]+\\\\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})$";

This is what I'm using but I seem to be getting wrong entries ? Can anyone assist me ?

Thanks

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2  
Perhaps you could provide an example "wrong entry" that is improperly validated by your code? –  richardtallent Jun 20 '11 at 6:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you're double-escaping your backslashes. It's helpful to use the @ syntax for string declaration to avoid this confusion:

public const string Email = @"^([a-zA-Z0-9_\\-\\.]+)@((\\[[0-9]{1,3}\\.[0-9]{1,3}\\.[0-9]{1,3}\\.)|(([a-zA-Z0-9\\-]+\\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})$";

You'll be closer without the double-escape:

public const string Email = @"^([a-zA-Z0-9_\-\.]+)@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|(([a-zA-Z0-9\\-]+\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})$";

The \[ after the matched @ is probably also a mistake, leaving...

public const string Email = @"^([a-zA-Z0-9_\-\.]+)@(([0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|(([a-zA-Z0-9\\-]+\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})$";
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aha ! thanks so much - yes this is exactly the problem :) no idea why I got downvoted :( –  Tom Jun 20 '11 at 6:28

This is regular expression, what i used in my code..all the way tested..and handled every scenario .

(([ ]*[A-Za-z0-9]([_]{1}[A-Za-z0-9])*([.]{1}[A-Za-z0-9])*([-]{1}[A-Za-z0-9])*)+\\@([A-Za-z0-9_\\-\\.])+\\.([A-Za-z]{2,4}))[ ]*(((;|,|; | ;| ; | , | ,){1}"+"([ ]*[A-Za-z0-9]([_]{1}[A-Za-z0-9])*([.]{1}[A-Za-z0-9])*([-]{1}[A-Za-z0-9])*)+\\@([A-Za-z0-9_\\-\\.])+\\.([A-Za-z]{2,4}[ ]*))*)[ ]*
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What about tld like museum or travel? And name like jean-françois? –  M42 Aug 14 '12 at 9:57

try this dude,

public const string Email= "^[_a-z0-9-]+(\.[_a-z0-9-]+)*@[a-z0-9-]+(\.[a-z0-9-]+)*(\.[a-z]{2,3})$";
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Validating an email address with a regular expression is hard. See http://www.ex-parrot.com/~pdw/Mail-RFC822-Address.html for one done in perl.

Unless the addresses are coming from a single source where you know or control the local part (i.e internal to your organization), anything less than the above is going to be imperfect. Consider carefully whether it is worth doing...how many valid addresses are you comfortable labeling invalid?

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I used this. working great :)

 /^((([a-z]|\d|[!#\$%&'\*\+\-\/=\?\^_`{\|}~]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])+(\.([a-z]|\d|[!#\$%&'\*\+\-\/=\?\^_`{\|}~]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])+)*)|((\x22)((((\x20|\x09)*(\x0d\x0a))?(\x20|\x09)+)?(([\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x7f]|\x21|[\x23-\x5b]|[\x5d-\x7e]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(\\([\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0d-\x7f]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF]))))*(((\x20|\x09)*(\x0d\x0a))?(\x20|\x09)+)?(\x22)))@((([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])([a-z]|\d|-|\.|_|~|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])*([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])))\.)+(([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])([a-z]|\d|-|\.|_|~|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])*([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])))\.?$/i
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Just use the MailAddress class.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh392kbs.aspx

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this doesn't prevent test@test from going through, since server to server, this is OK. –  Scott Jun 21 '11 at 18:50
    
Starting next year test@test will be a legitimate email address. upi.com/Business_News/2011/06/20/ICANN-approves-dot-changes/… –  Jonathan Allen Jun 23 '11 at 21:51

This page has a great discussion of what regular expression to use for matching email addresses, and the merits of these variants.

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