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I've just started using backbone.js and I'm adding some basic methods to extend a collection allowing me to iterate through a collection and save all models, and iterate through a collection to destroy all models. I realise that bulk updates aren't RESTful, but I'm only updating to local storage so didn't think it would be an issue to do multiple updates.

In my base application, the collection has 9 models. When I call collection.saveModels() it correctly logs the length of the collection, and correctly saves all the models.

When I call collection.deleteModels() it correctly logs the length of the collection, but skips every second model (i.e. the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th). Each time delete is pressed it continues to only delete the odd indexed element, with the last item to be deleted being the 8th original item.

Is it possible I'm using the each function incorrectly, despite it working perfectly when I save?

_.extend(Backbone.Collection.prototype, Backbone.Events, {
saveModels  :   function() {
    console.log(this.length);
    this.each(function(model){
        console.log('saving model ' + model.get('name'));
        model.save();
    });
},
deleteModels    :   function() {
    console.log(this.length);
    this.each(function(model){
        console.log('deleting model ' + model.get('name'));
        model.destroy();
    });
}
});

and they are called like so: mycollection.saveModels(); and mycollection.deleteModels();

I realise I can iterate through the collection based on length, but I'd rather use the built in method where possible.

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3  
the main problem, in general, with deleting things in loops is that it messes up where the loop currently is - the length of the loop gets shortened, and the "next" item index actually refers to the item after the next one - for example, if you delete the first item, the next index for the loop would be the second item, but what was the second item is now the first - so the third item is now the second - hope that makes sense –  kinakuta Jun 20 '11 at 6:54
    
Ah, that's it. Didn't even think about that! –  djlumley Jun 20 '11 at 6:55
1  
Seems you would need to loop using length, but loop backwards in any case –  mplungjan Jun 20 '11 at 7:39
    
@kinakuta you should write that as the answer. I believe it's correct –  Pablo Fernandez Jun 21 '11 at 3:57
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The code bradgonesurfing posted doesn't actually work as the clone method doesn't return an underscore object. The correct way is to use the _.chain method with makes each method chainable.

_.chain(App.articles.models).clone().each(function(model){
  console.log('deleting model ' + model.get('name'));
  model.destroy();
});
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absolute awesomeness!!!! thank ya! –  nuc Jul 3 '12 at 8:44
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Every time you call model.destroy() it removes itself from the collection. The each iterator doesn't know this. Do something like the following.

_.chain(App.articles.models).clone().each(function(model){
  console.log('deleting model ' + model.get('name'));
  model.destroy();
});

Backbone has access to underscore.js utils. First clone the models array then iterate over that and then destroy each model. Should work

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1  
Your solution is not valid as clone doesn't return an underscore object, I've posted the correct solution using the chain method stackoverflow.com/a/11032971/109995 –  JamieD Jun 14 '12 at 12:23
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The code below worked great for me:

  destroyAll: function (options) {
    while (this.models.length > 0) {
        this.models[0].destroy(options);
    }    
}
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It's been a while since I've used backbone, but just about to use it on another project - and this looks like an even nicer solution - thanks! –  djlumley Oct 31 '11 at 1:07
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This is the implementation of kinakuta's comment I ended up using.

destroy_models  :   function() {
    for (var i = this.length - 1; i > -1; i -=1){
        this.getByCid('c'+i).destroy();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ths is completely wrong. You are not guaranteed that the cid's are contiguous from 0..(length-1). Look at the implementation of getByCid. It uses a hash lookup not an array index lookup. My answer above is correct and will work in all cases. –  bradgonesurfing Jul 1 '11 at 9:15
    
I did a bit more research and it looks like you're right, I did upvote your originally, but had selected mine as the answer, because it was providing the answer to my problem~ –  djlumley Jul 3 '11 at 4:15
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