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In Visual Studio 2010, Dockable Windows seem to work like expected in every situation.
If a "Floating" document is active and some menu is selected (e.g Edit -> Paste), then the "Floating" document still has Focus and the command will be executed against that "Floating" window. Also, notice how this is clearly visible in the UI. MainWindow.xaml is still active and the Main window in Visual Studio is inactive even though the Team-menu is selected.

enter image description here

I've been trying to get the same behavior using alot of different 3rd-party docking components but they all have the same problem: once I select the menu, the MainWindow is focused and my floating window does not have focus anymore. Does anyone know of a way to get the same behavior here as in Visual Studio?

At the moment I'm using Infragistics xamDockManager and the problem can be reproduced with the following sample code.

  • Right click "Header 1" and select "Float"
  • Click the "File" menu
  • Notice how MainWindow receives focus.

xmlns:igDock="http://infragistics.com/DockManager"

<DockPanel LastChildFill="True">
    <Menu DockPanel.Dock="Top">
        <MenuItem Header="_File">
            <MenuItem Header="_New"/>
        </MenuItem>
    </Menu>
    <Grid>
        <igDock:XamDockManager x:Name="dockManager" Theme="Aero">
            <igDock:DocumentContentHost>
                <igDock:SplitPane>
                    <igDock:TabGroupPane>
                        <igDock:ContentPane Header="Header 1">
                            <TextBox Text="Some Text"/>
                        </igDock:ContentPane>
                        <igDock:ContentPane Header="Header 2">
                            <TextBox Text="Some Other Text"/>
                        </igDock:ContentPane>
                    </igDock:TabGroupPane>
                </igDock:SplitPane>
            </igDock:DocumentContentHost>
        </igDock:XamDockManager>
    </Grid>
</DockPanel>
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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+500

The visual studio team has some good information on lessons they learned when making VS in WPF. One of the issues they ran into was related to Focus management. As a result, WPF 4 has some new features to help out.

Here's the info on the issue that sounds like your situation:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudio/archive/2010/03/09/wpf-in-visual-studio-2010-part-3-focus-and-activation.aspx

Their discussion of the new "HwndSource.DefaultAcquireHwndFocusInMenuMode" property sounds very similar to what you're running into.

EDIT

After further investigation, it looks like Visual Studio might be hooking the windows message loop and returning specific values to make the floating windows work.

I'm not a win32 programmer, but it seems that when a user clicks a menu in an inactive window, windows sends the WM_MOUSEACTIVATE message to it before processing the mouse down event. This lets the main window determine whether it should be activated.

In my unmodified WPF test app, the inactive window returns MA_ACTIVATE. However, VS returns MA_NOACTIVATE. The docs indicate that this tells windows NOT to activate the main window prior to handling further input. I'm guessing that visual studio hooks the windows message loop and returns MA_NOACTIVATE when the user clicks on the menus / toolbars.

I was able to make this work in a simple, two window WPF app by adding this code to the top level window.

    protected override void OnSourceInitialized(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnSourceInitialized(e);

        var hook = new HwndSourceHook(this.FilterMessage);
        var source2 = HwndSource.FromVisual(this) as HwndSource;
        source2.AddHook(hook);
    }

    private IntPtr FilterMessage(IntPtr hwnd, int msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, ref bool handled)
    {
        const int WM_MOUSEACTIVATE = 0x0021;
        const int MA_NOACTIVATE = 3;

        switch (msg)
        {
            case WM_MOUSEACTIVATE:
                handled = true;
                return new IntPtr(MA_NOACTIVATE);
        }
        return IntPtr.Zero;
    }

In your case, you'd probably need to add more logic that would check what the user clicked on and decide based on that whether to intercept the message and return MA_NOACTIVATE.

EDIT 2

I've attached a sample WPF application that shows how to do this with a simple WPF application. This should work pretty much the same with floating windows from a docking toolkit, but I haven't tested that specific scenario.

The sample is available at: http://blog.alner.net/downloads/floatingWindowTest.zip

The sample has code comments to explain how it works. To see it in action, run the sample, click the "open another window" button. This should put focus in the textbox of the new window. Now, click the edit menu of the main window and use the commands like "select all". These should operate on the other window without bringing the "main window" to the foreground.

You can also click on the "exit" menu item to see that it can still route commands to the main window if needed.

Key Points (Activation / Focus):

  1. Use the HwndSource.DefaultAcquireHwndFocusInMenuMode to get the menus to work stop grabbing focus.
  2. Hook the message loop and return "MA_NOACTIVATE" when the user clicks the menu.
  3. Add an event handler to the menu's PreviewGotKeyboardFocus and set e.Handled to true so that the menu wont' attempt to grab focus.

Key Points (Commands):

  1. Hook the main window's "CommandManager.PreviewCanExecute" and "CommandManager.PreviewExecuted" events.
  2. In these events, detect whether the app has an "other window" that's supposed to be the target of events.
  3. Manually invoke the original command against the "other window".

Hope it works for you. If not, let me know.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link, I've actually already read it three times. Can't really get it to work using those properties though but yes, they seem like they are made to solve problems like this one. Got any idea how to work them?:) –  Fredrik Hedblad Jul 18 '11 at 23:34
    
Meleak, I added a bit of info that I found by using Spy++ to watch the windows messages that VS sends. I was able to make a simple test app behave similar to VS by adding this code to the main window. The main window had a menu control and also opened a child window. With the above code, the child window did not loose focus when clicking the menu. –  NathanAW Jul 19 '11 at 19:57
    
I've created a sample that shows this working. There are a couple more little details than what's noted above. These are described in the sample's code comments. –  NathanAW Jul 20 '11 at 21:36
1  
I made some additions to your first update, hooking the message loop for floating windows and return False for WM_NCACTIVATE (to stop menus from taking focus) if the item belonged to the MainMenu or the MainMenu was open. Worked ok, sometimes the menu would close unexpectedly. After your last update, I removed the floating windows message hook and added HwndSource.DefaultAcquireHwndFocusInMenuMode = true, Keyboard.DefaultRestoreFocusMode = RestoreFocusMode.None and e.Handled = true in the PreviewGotKeyboardFocus event for the Menu and now everything works 100% as far as I can tell! –  Fredrik Hedblad Jul 21 '11 at 2:43
1  
I took your solution and made a Window Style for MainWindow in a ResourceDictionary that can be used with regular windows or any Dockable Windows toolkit (like you said in your answer) and posted it as another answer. It includes hit testing specifically for the MainMenu to decide if focusing should be allowed. Can't believe how good your answer works :) People at work will be very happy about this, thanks again! –  Fredrik Hedblad Jul 21 '11 at 3:43

I used the great answer from NathanAW and created a ResourceDictionary containing a Style for Window (which should be used by the MainWindow), contained the key pieces to solve this problem.

Update: Added support for ToolBar as well as Menu

It includes hit testing specifically for the MainMenu or ToolBar to decide if focusing should be allowed.

The reason I've used a ResourceDictionary for this is for reusability since we will be using this in many projects. Also, the code behind for the MainWindow can stay clean.

MainWindow can use this style with

<Window...>
    <Window.Resources>
        <ResourceDictionary>
            <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
                <ResourceDictionary Source="NoFocusMenuWindowDictionary.xaml"/>
            </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
        </ResourceDictionary>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Window.Style>
        <StaticResource ResourceKey="NoFocusMenuWindow"/>
    </Window.Style>
    <!--...-->
</Window>

NoFocusMenuWindowDictionary.xaml

<ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
                    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
                    x:Class="MainWindowVS2010Mode.NoFocusMenuWindowDictionary">
    <Style x:Key="NoFocusMenuWindow" TargetType="Window">
        <EventSetter Event="Loaded" Handler="MainWindow_Loaded"/>
    </Style>
    <Style TargetType="Menu">
        <EventSetter Event="PreviewGotKeyboardFocus"
                     Handler="Menu_PreviewGotKeyboardFocus"/>
    </Style>
    <Style TargetType="ToolBar">
        <EventSetter Event="PreviewGotKeyboardFocus"
                     Handler="ToolBar_PreviewGotKeyboardFocus"/>
    </Style>
</ResourceDictionary>

NoFocusMenuWindowDictionary.xaml.cs

namespace MainWindowVS2010Mode
{
    public partial class NoFocusMenuWindowDictionary
    {
        #region Declaration

        private static Window _mainWindow;
        private static bool _mainMenuOrToolBarClicked;

        #endregion // Declaration

        void MainWindow_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            _mainWindow = sender as Window;
            HwndSource.DefaultAcquireHwndFocusInMenuMode = true;
            Keyboard.DefaultRestoreFocusMode = RestoreFocusMode.None;
            HwndSource hwndSource = HwndSource.FromVisual(_mainWindow) as HwndSource;
            hwndSource.AddHook(FilterMessage);
        }

        private static IntPtr FilterMessage(IntPtr hwnd, int msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, ref bool handled)
        {
            const int WM_MOUSEACTIVATE = 0x0021;
            const int MA_NOACTIVATE = 3;

            switch (msg)
            {
                case WM_MOUSEACTIVATE:

                    if (ClickedMainMenuOrToolBarItem())
                    {
                        handled = true;
                        return new IntPtr(MA_NOACTIVATE);
                    }
                    break;
            }
            return IntPtr.Zero;
        }

        #region Hit Testing

        private static bool ClickedMainMenuOrToolBarItem()
        {
            _mainMenuOrToolBarClicked = false;
            Point clickedPoint = Mouse.GetPosition(_mainWindow);
            VisualTreeHelper.HitTest(_mainWindow,
                                     null,
                                     new HitTestResultCallback(HitTestCallback),
                                     new PointHitTestParameters(clickedPoint));
            return _mainMenuOrToolBarClicked;
        }

        private static HitTestResultBehavior HitTestCallback(HitTestResult result)
        {
            DependencyObject visualHit = result.VisualHit;
            Menu parentMenu = GetVisualParent<Menu>(visualHit);
            if (parentMenu != null && parentMenu.IsMainMenu == true)
            {
                _mainMenuOrToolBarClicked = true;
                return HitTestResultBehavior.Stop;
            }
            ToolBar parentToolBar = GetVisualParent<ToolBar>(visualHit);
            if (parentToolBar != null)
            {
                _mainMenuOrToolBarClicked = true;
                return HitTestResultBehavior.Stop;
            }
            return HitTestResultBehavior.Continue;
        }

        public static T GetVisualParent<T>(object childObject) where T : Visual
        {
            DependencyObject child = childObject as DependencyObject;
            while ((child != null) && !(child is T))
            {
                child = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(child);
            }
            return child as T;
        }
        #endregion // Hit Testing

        #region Menu

        private void Menu_PreviewGotKeyboardFocus(object sender, KeyboardFocusChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            Menu menu = sender as Menu;
            if (menu.IsMainMenu == true)
            {
                e.Handled = true;
            }
        }

        #endregion // Menu

        #region ToolBar

        private void ToolBar_PreviewGotKeyboardFocus(object sender, KeyboardFocusChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            e.Handled = true;
        }

        #endregion // ToolBar
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, and very clean! I like how you set this up as a style and simplified the code. Thanks for posting this back! –  NathanAW Jul 21 '11 at 11:31
    
Hey, I posted another answer and would be cool if you and others look into it, Apparently you have to set the HwndSource property before Window.Show() is called.. I was able to get it working without filtering messages, but I still had to handle GotKeyboardFocus and set it to handled –  Alan Mar 28 '13 at 15:27
    
This is a great start. I used the code as attached properties and styled Menu and ToolBar elements globally with the attached properties. Unfortunately, it is not a complete solution for apps looking to support the keyboard. For example, pressing ALT+F to go to the file menu will not work from the floating window. And when the main window is active, ALT+F does not take focus (due to the e.Handled=true) and then you cannot use the arrow keys to navigate the main menu. I am working on a solution for my app. If it is generic enough, I'll post the details. VS 2010 handles this somehow. –  Jim Strav Jul 2 '13 at 2:44
    
@JimStrav: Yes, I'm aware of the keyboard problem and I've made a solution where this is handled manually in code behind. The code for it is awful though (close to 1000 lines) so that's why I haven't posted it here. Maybe I should put up a link to the file with a little disclaimer :-) –  Fredrik Hedblad Jul 2 '13 at 8:50

Just out of curiosity, have you tried binding the MenuItem.CommandTarget to the XamDockManager.ActivePane?

Looking at the XamDockManager documentation, I also see a CurrentFlyoutPane property which returns "the Infragistics.Windows.DockManager.ContentPane currently within the UnpinnedTabFlyout or null if the flyout is not shown." I'm not sure which property would be appropriate in your scenario, but it's worth a try.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried ActivePane and it changes as soon as the menu opens.. I haven't tried CurrentFlyoutPane but I'll try it out. Even if it works it still leaves the problem that the users will get confused when another documents gets focus when they're using the menus. –  Fredrik Hedblad Jul 18 '11 at 20:55

I know this is an old post, but Prism could make your life so much easier. Using the RegionAdapter created here:

http://brianlagunas.com/2012/09/12/xamdockmanagera-prism-regionadapter/

You can easily track which window is active, floating or not, by using the IActiveAware interface. Prisms commands also take this into consideration and can excute commands only on the active view. The blog post has a sample app you can play around with.

share|improve this answer
1  
I have this same problem in a Prism application with IActiveAware, It probably really depends on how the DockSiteRegionAdapter, Region, Behavior, is implemented. I don't see them handling these events though... –  Alan Mar 28 '13 at 13:57
    
I blogged about taking the above approach and simplifying it for Prism CompositeCommands and IActiveAware DelegateCommands. brianlagunas.com/… –  Brian Lagunas May 31 '13 at 1:58

Im not sure about how to make this work, but I do know the Infragistics have a great support forum so it may be worth asking there question there too.

http://forums.infragistics.com/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, and yes, I've asked the same question at the infragistics forum :) –  Fredrik Hedblad Jun 20 '11 at 11:08

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