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in another post, MSN gave me a good guide on solving my algebra problem (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/639215/calculating-bid-price-from-total-cost). Now, even though I can calculate it by hand, I'm completely stuck on how to write this in pseudocode or code. Anyone could give me a quick hint? By the way, I want to calculate the bid given the final costs .

usage cost(bid) = PIN(bid*0.10, 10, 50)
seller cost(bid) = bid*.02
added cost(bid) = PIN(ceiling(bid/500)*5, 5, 10) + PIN(ceiling((bid - 1000)/2000)*5, 0, 10)
storing cost(bid) = 100
So the final cost is something like:

final cost(bid) = PIN(bid*.1, 10, 50) + pin(ceiling(bid/500)*5, 5, 20) + PIN(ceiling((bid - 1000)/2000)*10, 0, 20) + bid*.02 + 100 + bid
Solve for a particular value and you're done.

For example, if you want the total cost to be $2000:

2000 = PIN(bid*.1, 10, 50) + pin(ceiling(bid/500)*5, 5, 10) + PIN(ceiling((bid - 1000)/2000)*5, 0, 10) + bid*.02 + 100 + bid.
Bid must be at least > 1500 and < 2000, which works out nicely since we can make those PIN sections constant:

2000 = 50 + 10 + 5 + 100 + bid*1.02
1835 = bid*1.02
bid = 1799.0196078431372549019607843137
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If you were using Haskell, you're pseudo code would require very minor changes before it was real, working code :) Function names can't have spaces and parameters don't need parens. –  Daniel Pratt Mar 13 '09 at 1:20
    
You might want to explicitly mention that you want to calculate the bid given the final costs (i.e. you want the inverse of the function "final cost()"). Not everyone will read your original question. –  mweerden Mar 13 '09 at 1:43
    
@mweerden: Good call; I totally missed what he was trying to do the first time around (and I even did read the original question :-/) –  Daniel LeCheminant Mar 13 '09 at 2:12
    
my bad for the confusion, my question was probably badly formed. Thank you for your answer, I understand better now. –  fbernier Mar 13 '09 at 2:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The function simplifies to:

                  / 1.02 * bid + 115   bid <   100
                  | 1.12 * bid + 105   bid <=  500
final cost(bid) = | 1.02 * bid + 160   bid <= 1000
                  | 1.02 * bid + 165   bid <= 3000
                  \ 1.02 * bid + 170   otherwise

If you consider each piece as a separate function, they can be inverted:

bid_a(cost) = (cost - 115) / 1.02
bid_b(cost) = (cost - 105) / 1.12
bid_c(cost) = (cost - 160) / 1.02
bid_d(cost) = (cost - 165) / 1.02
bid_e(cost) = (cost - 170) / 1.02

If you plug your cost into each function you get an estimated bid value for that range. You must check that this value indeed is within that functions valid range.

Example:

cost = 2000

bid_a(2000) = (2000 - 115) / 1.02 = 1848  Too big! Need to be < 100
bid_b(2000) = (2000 - 105) / 1.12 = 1692  Too big! Need to be <= 500
bid_c(2000) = (2000 - 160) / 1.02 = 1804  Too big! Need to be <= 1000
bid_d(2000) = (2000 - 165) / 1.02 = 1799  Good. It is <= 3000
bid_e(2000) = (2000 - 170) / 1.02 = 1794  Too small! Need to be > 3000

Just to check:

final cost(1799) = 1.02 * 1799 + 165 = 2000   Good!

Since the original function is strictly increasing, at most one of those functions will give an acceptable value. But for some inputs none of them will give a good value. This is because the original function jumps over those values.

final cost(1000) = 1.02 * 1000 + 160 = 1180
final cost(1001) = 1.02 * 1001 + 165 = 1186

So no function will give an acceptable value for cost = 1182 for example.

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You beat me by 32 seconds! Your explanation is probably a bit clearer and just calculating all values instead of first figuring out the one or two most relevant functions is probably also easier. +1 –  mweerden Mar 13 '09 at 2:38
    
One thing: you wrote bid instead of cost in the definitions of bid_X. –  mweerden Mar 13 '09 at 2:42
    
@mweerden: Good catch. –  Markus Jarderot Mar 13 '09 at 3:13
    
+1 for being thorough –  Daniel LeCheminant Mar 13 '09 at 4:29
    
Excellent explanation. thanks a lot!!! –  fbernier Mar 13 '09 at 14:32

Due to the use of PIN and ceiling, I don't see a easy way to invert the calculation. Assuming that bid has a fixed precision (I'd guess two decimals behind the dot) you can always use a binary search (as the functions are monotone).

Edit: After thinking about it some more, I observed that, taking x = bid*1.02 + 100, we have that the final costs are between x+15 (exclusive) and x+70 (inclusive) (i.e. x+15 < final cost < x+70). Given the size of this range (70-15=55) and the fact that the special values (see note below) for bid are all apart more than this, you can take x+15 = final cost and x+70 = final cost, get the right cases/values of usage and added costs and simply solve that equation (which no longer has either PIN or ceiling in it).

To illustrate, let the final cost be 222. From x+15 = 222 it follows that bid = 107/1.02 = 104.90. Then we have that the usage costs are given by bid*0.1 and that the additional costs are 5. In other words, we get final cost = bid*0.1 + bid*0.02 + 5 + 100 + bid = bid*1.12 + 105 and therefore bid = (222-105)/1.12 = 104.46. As this value of bid means the right values for usage and additional costs were taken, we know that this is the solution.

However, if we would have first looked at x+70 = 222, we would get the following. First we get that for this assumption that bid = 52/1.02 = 50.98. This means that usage costs are 10 and the additional costs are 5. So we get final costs = 10 + bid*0.02 + 5 + 100 + bid = bid*1.02 + 115 and therefore bid = (222-115)/1.02 = 104.90. But if bid is 104.90 then the usage costs are not 10 but bid*0.1, so this isn't the right solution.

I hope I explained it clearly enough. If not, please let me know.

N.B.: With special values I mean those for which the function defining the values of usage and added costs change. For example, for usage cost these values are 100 and 500: below 100 you use 10, above 500 you use 50 and in between you use bid*0.1.

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great explanation. thank you for your time! Sad thing is MizardX made a perfect one .. :P –  fbernier Mar 13 '09 at 14:33
    
No problem. I'll just cry for a week and afterwards I'll probably forget all about it. ;) –  mweerden Mar 13 '09 at 17:17

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