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I'm writing a jQuery plugin, but I'm having a problem:

My HTML element

<a id="trac"></a>

My JS that calls the plugin

$('#trac').myplugin();

My plugin

$.fn.myplugin = function(){
    var $root;
    return this.each(function(){
        $root = $(this);
        $root.live('click',function(){
            console.log('here');
        });
    });
}

It happens that "here" is never displayed. But if I use...

 $('#trac').live('click',function(){
     console.log('here');
 });

..."here" is displayed. I don't understand why it is happening because $root and $('#trac') are exactly the same jQuery object.

How can I fix it?

Thanks!

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Is your plugin loaded before it is called and do you use document.ready() arround $('#trac').myplugin();? –  powtac Jun 20 '11 at 12:47
    
What do you want the plugin to do? Why are you using ".live()"? –  Pointy Jun 20 '11 at 12:49
    
Yes, it is loaded inside a document.ready(). –  Luiz Fernando Jun 20 '11 at 12:52
    
I had a pause for reflection when I saw the "live" inside the "each" and why you are doing that as the "live" would not normally be multiply applied like that. –  Mark Schultheiss Jun 20 '11 at 13:41
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The ".live()" function needs a selector, and in your plugin you're not giving it one. The jQuery object you build ($(this)) is a valid object but there's no selector string involved.

You could directly bind the handler:

  $root.click(function() { ... });

To elaborate: you say, "... because $root and $('#trac') are exactly the same." The problem is that that is not really true. When you build a jQuery object with a selector string, the object keeps that selector string around. There's no string when you build "$root" from "$(this)". The ".live()" function operates by creating a handler on the <body> element and then testing the target of each event that bubbles up against that selector.

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Great answer! Thank you very much! –  Luiz Fernando Jun 20 '11 at 12:59
    
I also like this answer. –  Mark Schultheiss Jun 20 '11 at 13:39
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I like the other answer as a "direct" answer to the question but to show some alternate to what you are doing for others I think you can simplfy the plugin as:

<div id="mystuff">hi</div>
<div id='answer'>empty</div>

$.fn.myplugin = function() {
    this.live('click', function() {
        $('#answer').text('here');
    });
}
$('#mystuff').myplugin();

as shown in this example: http://jsfiddle.net/FgUEB/, thus the "this" gets the selector and you can then attach the "live click" - without the complexity of the .each - which, IF you do it the way you have it (with the selector fixed of course) will put the event on the elements multiple times if it has several - which is implied by the .each you have in your example.

jQuery.fn.newMethod = function(){
    return this.each(function(){
        alert(typeof this);
    });
};

The reference this keyword within the inner function (in the alert) refers to the current HTML element. Since it is NOT a jQuery object it won't have access to the jQuery methods (although, you can wrap it in the jQuery object to get those methods back as jQuery(this).

jQuery.fn.newMethod = function(){
    return this.each(function(){
        jQuery(this).css({'background-color':'red'});//each inner element
    });
};
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