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How can I "mask" the values of a datagridview in a windows forms application? In example, how can I limit the value in a column datagridviewtextboxcolumn so that is not bigger than a given number? (i.e. cell value in that column < 9.6) I build my datagridview programmatically at runtime.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can just use if() on CellEndEdit event handler

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Perfect. In this way the user has direct feedback of his action. If I insert 9 when the max value is 8, I can catch this and change it in once. Maybe not so good performances but nice graphical effect. –  Francesco Jun 21 '11 at 9:29

The easiest way to do this, if possible, is to validate the value at the entity level.

For instance, say we have the following simplified Foo entity;

public class Foo
{
    private readonly int id;
    private int type;
    private string name;

    public Foo(int id, int type, string name)
    {
        this.id = id;
        this.type = type;
        this.name = name;
    }

    public int Id { get { return this.id; } }

    public int Type
    {
        get
        {
            return this.type;
        }
        set
        {
            if (this.type != value)
            {
                if (value >= 0 && value <= 5) //Validation rule
                {
                    this.type = value;
                } 
            }
        }
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return this.name;
        }
        set
        {
            if (this.name != value)
            {
                this.name = value;
            }
        }
    }
}

Now we can bind to our DataGridView a List<Foo> foos and we will be effectively masking any input in the "Type" DataGridViewColumn.

If this isn't a valid path, then simply handle the CellEndEdit event and validate the input.

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Good answer. But in this way can I actively constrain the values giving direct feedback to the user? –  Francesco Jun 21 '11 at 9:27
    
@Francesco: Giving an error message might be more cumbersome. But the user does get direct feedback in a way as he will see that his edit is canceled as soon as he tries to commit it. For example, in the example I gave you, if the end user enters a 8 in a Type field DataGridViewCell, when he commits the value (hits enter) it will switch right back to the original value as the modification could not be set in the underlying entity. –  InBetween Jun 21 '11 at 9:46

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