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Here is my program which creates a link list and also reverses it.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
struct node {
    int data;
    struct node *next;
};
struct node *list=NULL;
struct node *root=NULL;
static int count=0;
struct node *create_node(int);//function to create node
void travel_list(void);
void create_list(int);
void reverse_list(void);
int main()
{
    int i, j, choice;
    printf("Enter a number this will be root of tree\n");
    scanf("%d", &i);
    create_list(i);
    printf("Enter  1 to enter more numbers \n 0 to quit\n");
    scanf("%d", &choice);
    while (choice!=0){
     printf("Enter a no for link list\n");
        scanf("%d",&i);
//  printf("going to create list in while\n");
    create_list(i);
        travel_list(); 
    printf("Enter  1 to enter more numbers \n 0 to quit\n");
    scanf("%d", &choice);
    }
    printf("reversing list\n");
     reverse_list();
     travel_list();
 }


// end of function main
void create_list (int data)
{
 struct node *t1,*t2;
 //printf("in function create_list\n");
 t1=create_node(data);
 t2=list;
 if( count!=0)
 {
   while(t2->next!=NULL)
   {
   t2=t2->next;
   }
 t2->next=t1;
 count++;
 }
 else 
  {
   root=t1;
   list=t1;
   count++;
  }
}
struct node *create_node(int data)
{
    struct node *temp;
    temp = (struct node *)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
        temp->data=data;
    temp->next=NULL;
  //      printf("create node temp->data=%d\n",temp->data);
//  printf("the adress of node created %p\n",temp);
    return temp;
}
void travel_list(void )
{
 struct node *t1;
 t1=list;
 printf("in travel list\n");
 while(t1!=NULL)
 {
 printf("%d-->",t1->data);
 t1=t1->next;
 }
 printf("\n");
}
void reverse_list(void)
{
    struct node *t1,*t2,*t3;
       t1=list;
    t2=list->next;
    t3=list->next->next; 
   int reverse=0;
   if(reverse==0)
   {
    t1->next=NULL;
    t2->next=t1;
    t1=t2;
    t2=t3;
    t3=t3->next;
    reverse++;

    }


    while(t3!=NULL)
     {

     t2->next=t1;
    t1=t2;
    t2=t3;
    list=t1;
    travel_list();
    t3=t3->next;
    }
    t2->next=t1;
    list=t2;
}

Above is a fully working code. I want to know if there can be further enhancement to the above code?

share|improve this question
    
If this is homework tag it. – Nix Jun 20 '11 at 13:01
2  
have a look @ codereview.stackexchange.com – Fredrik Pihl Jun 20 '11 at 13:01
    
If you make your linked list a double linked list, that is, each node has a pointer to the next one and the previous and if you keep pointers to the first and last node, you won't need to reverse it. Just travel it backawards using the backwards pointers.... – Fred Jun 20 '11 at 23:40
up vote 4 down vote accepted
  • Make your indentation and whitespace usage consistent
  • Use meaningful identifiers rather than t1, t2 and t3
  • Make the data member a generic type, for example void * rather than int.
  • Don't use global variables, pass struct node * pointers to your functions.
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 ... and don't use global variables is a BIG improvement – pmg Jun 20 '11 at 15:19
    
@pmg why is use of global variables a problem? – Registered User Jun 21 '11 at 10:06
1  
@Registered: without globals you know foo(&bar) will only change bar's value; with globals any (global) variable can change. Also read Global Variables Are Bad. – pmg Jun 21 '11 at 10:19

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