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Is this possible?

I am trying to port an old professor's demo-game into a web-playable format for fun, and he had setup all the graphics in the XPM format.

Is there some way to load XPM files directly into an HTML5 canvas? I could probably get by with loading them into an image editor and converting...but I'd rather stay as true to the original source as possible.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could probably write some sort of parser for XPM in JavaScript and render canvas pixels using a similar approach to this question, however I think it'd be more efficient just to use something like ImageMagick and do a one off conversion:

mogrify -format png *.xpm
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I made a little plugin to do this, there's a lot to improve but maybe it can help you... you can see the demo here: http://cortezcristian.com.ar/xpm2canvas/

You can also play with the demo in this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/crisboot/aXt3G/

<script src="./js/libs/jquery-1.7.1.min.js"></script>
  <script src="./js/jquery.xpm2canvas.js"></script>
  <script>
        var pseudoXMP = [
            /* <Values> */
            /* <width/cols> <height/rows> <colors> <char on pixel>*/
            "40 40 6 1",
            /* <Colors> */
            "     c none",
            ".    c #ffffff",
            "X    c #dadab6",
            "o    c #6c91b6",
            "O    c #476c6c",
            "+    c #000000",
            /* <Pixels> */
            "                                        ",
            "                                        ",
            "                                        ",
            "        .      .X..XX.XX      X         ",
            "        ..   .....X.XXXXXX   XX         ",
            "        ... ....X..XX.XXXXX XXX         ",
            "   ..   ..........X.XXXXXXXXXXX   XX    ",
            "   .... ........X..XX.XXXXXXXXX XXXX    ",
            "   .... ..........X.XXXXXXXXXXX XXXX    ",
            "   ooOOO..ooooooOooOOoOOOOOOOXX+++OO++  ",
            "   ooOOO..ooooooooOoOOOOOOOOOXX+++OO++  ",
            "   ....O..ooooooOooOOoOOOOOOOXX+XXXX++  ",
            "   ....O..ooooooooOoOOOOOOOOOXX+XXXX++  ",
            "   ..OOO..ooooooOooOOoOOOOOOOXX+++XX++  ",
            "    ++++..ooooooooOoOOOOOOOOOXX+++ +++  ",
            "     +++..ooooooOooOOoOOOOOOOXX+++  +   ",
            "      ++..ooooooooOoOOOOOOOOOXX+++      ",
            "        ..ooooooOooOOoOOOOOOOXX+++      ",
            "        ..ooooooooOoOOOOOOOOOXX+++      ",
            "        ..ooooooOooOOoOOOOOOOXX+++      ",
            "        ..ooooooooOoOOOOOOOOOXX+++      ",
            "         ..oooooOooOOoOOOOOOXX+++       ",
            "         ..oooooooOoOOOOOOOOXX+++       ",
            "          ..ooooOooOOoOOOOOXX+++        ",
            "          ..ooooooOoOOOOOOOXX++++       ",
            "        ..o..oooOooOOoOOOOXX+XX+++      ",
            "       ...o..oooooOoOOOOOXX++XXX++      ",
            "      ....OO..ooOooOOoOOXX+++XXXX++     ",
            "     ...oo..+..oooOoOOOXX++XXooXXX++    ",
            "    ...ooo..++..OooOOoXX+++XXooOXXX+    ",
            "   ..oooOOXX+++....XXXX++++XXOOoOOXX+   ",
            "   ..oooOOXX+++ ...XXX+++++XXOOooOXX++  ",
            "   ..oooOXXX+++  ..XX+++  +XXOOooOXX++  ",
            "   .....XXX++++             XXXXXXX++   ",
            "    ....XX++++              XXXXXXX+    ",
            "     ...XX+++                XXXXX++    ",
            "                                        ",
            "                                        ",
            "                                        ",
            "                                        "];
        $(document).ready(function(){
            $('#xmp2canvas').xpm2canvas({xpm:pseudoXMP});
        });
  </script>
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IIRC, the rendering context for a canvas element in such a context relies on manipulating the src attribute of an embedded img tag. As such, presumably XPM files only stand a chance of working if the browser in question supports them.

The best way to check this would be to test it. The accepted answer for this question contains some code that should help:

importing image on canvas html5

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