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I have the the following:

void Class1::method()
{
  QStringList* file_list;
  collect_file_paths(file_list);    //Sends pointer to the method below
}

void Class1::collect_file_paths(QStringList* file_list)
{
  //Gather file paths
  DirectorySearch ds;
  connect(&ds, SIGNAL(updateStatus(QString)), this, SLOT(onStatusUpdate(QString)));
  file_list = ds.get_file_names(_strPath);  //Returns a pointer of QStringList
}

QStringList* DirectorySearch::get_file_names(QString path)
{
  QStringList *file_names = new QStringList;
  traverse(path, file_names);
  compare_existing(file_names);
  return file_names;  //returning pointer address
}

What is happening is that the memory address returned from get_file_names() is lost/deleted when I leave the scope of Class1::collect_file_paths(). It was my understanding that QStringList *file_names = new QStringList; in the DirectorySearch class in now on the memory heap. So it should be left on the heap until I call delete i.e. it is never out of scope. However, as mentioned above, the address/values of the QStingList are lost when I return to Class1::method() from collect_file_paths(file_list).

Can some explain what is happening?

Thanks.

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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you do file_list = ds.get_file_names(_strPath); //Returns a pointer of QStringList you are changing the value of the file_list (a 32/64b memory location) NOT the value of the data that memory location represents.

You need to pass a reference to your pointer (or a pointer to a pointer)

void Class1::method()
{
  QStringList* file_list;
  collect_file_paths(&file_list);    //Sends pointer to pointer to the method below
}

void Class1::collect_file_paths(QStringList** file_list)
{
  //Gather file paths
  DirectorySearch ds;
  connect(&ds, SIGNAL(updateStatus(QString)), this, SLOT(onStatusUpdate(QString)));
  *file_list = ds.get_file_names(_strPath); //set value of pointer in caller to value returned by below function
}
...

or so

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In your opinion, would you use pointers in this away? I've been looking at textbooks this afternoon trying to find more information about passing pointers in the way of method(<type>** var_name){}, but I haven't found anything yet. I'd like some advice on how more experienced programmers would approach my problem above/what would they change in the code. –  johnnyturbo3 Jun 20 '11 at 16:06
    
I prefer to use a pointer to a pointer ( int **var ) rather than a reference to a pointer ( int *&var ). If you do a Google search for 'pointer to pointer' some good stuff ought to come up. Also stackoverflow.com/search?q=pointer+to+pointer –  KitsuneYMG Jun 22 '11 at 13:20
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You need to return the result via a reference:

void Class1::collect_file_paths(QStringList& file_list)
{
  //Gather file paths
  DirectorySearch ds;
  connect(&ds, SIGNAL(updateStatus(QString)), this, SLOT(onStatusUpdate(QString)));
  file_list = ds.get_file_names(_strPath);  //Returns a pointer of QStringList
}
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The get_file_names() method is fine. Your problem is the collect_file_paths(). The file_list pointer is copied into the function, so assigning to it within collect_file_paths has no effect on file_list variable within the method.

One option is to use a reference to a pointer:

void Class1::collect_file_paths(QStringList*& file_list) ...

Or, as others suggest, just pass around reference to the list itself and act on that.

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Your collect_file_paths method does not modify the file_list pointer in any way that's visible. When collect_file_paths is called, it is given a memory address (pointer) of a QStringList. If you were to assign to the file_list variable, you would simply be pointing to a different QStringList, but the callers cannot see this.

It is as if you wrote the following:

void foo(int a)
{
  /* Callers will not see this change. */
  a = 5;
}

What you need to do is pass a pointer to the pointer:

void collect_file_paths(QStringList **file_list)
{
  *file_list = ...
}

void foo()
{
  QStringList *file_names;
  collect_file_paths(&file_names);
}
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The comment:

  collect_file_paths(file_list);    //Sends pointer to the method below

is wrong: The call copies the pointer to the method arguments.

So the line:

file_list = ds.get_file_names(_strPath);  //Returns a pointer of QStringList

Does nothing to the value in the method() method.

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