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I have the following in Java which basically does a nested triangular loop:

    int n = 10;
    B bs[] = new B[n];
    // some initial values, bla bla
    double dt = 0.001;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        bs[i] = new B();
        bs[i].x = i * 0.5;
        bs[i].v = i * 2.5;
        bs[i].m = i * 5.5;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        for (int j = **(i+1)**; j < n; j++) {
            double d = bs[i].x - bs[j].x;

            double sqr = d * d + 0.01;
            double dist = Math.sqrt(sqr);
            double mag = dt / (sqr * dist);

            bs[i].v -= d * bs[j].m * mag;
            **bs[j].v += d * bs[i].m * mag;**
        }
    }   

    // printing out the value v
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        System.out.println(bs[i].v);
    }

Class B:

class B {
    double x, v, m;
}

In each iteration, the value at index i and j of the array is updated at the same time thus avoiding to do a complete nested loop. The following gives the same result but it does a complete nested loop (excuse me for the terms i'm using, they may not be correct but i hope it does make sense).

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
            double d = bs[i].x - bs[j].x;

            double sqr = d * d + 0.01;
            double dist = Math.sqrt(sqr);
            double mag = dt / (sqr * dist);

            bs[i].v -= d * bs[j].m * mag;
        }
    }

NOTE: the only change from the previous code is int j = 0; NOT int j = (i+1); and removed bs[j].v += d * bs[i].m * mag;

I want to do same in Haskell but having difficulty to think about it properly. I have the following code. The array in the Haskell version is represented as a list (xs) which i've initialised to 0.

n = 20
xs = replicate n 0

update = foldl' (update') xs [0..(n-1)]
    where
        update' i = update'' i (i+1) []
        update'' i j acc
            | j == n = acc
            | otherwise = new_acc
                where
                    new_acc = result:acc
                    result = ...do something

I am going to have very big value for n e.g. 1000, 5000, etc. A complete nested loop when n = 1000 gives length [(i,j)|i<-[0..1000],j<-[0..1000]] = 1002001 but a triangular version gives length [(i,j)|i<-[0..1000],j<-[(i+1)..1000]] = 500500. Doing 2 maps in Haskell is easy to get it to do the complete loops but I want the triangular version. I guess this implies keeping the changes to i and j in a list and then update the original list at the end? Any idea would be much appreciated. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I think it would help if you explained what update_i and update_j does, and what result is, otherwise it is not clear how best write what you wish. –  HaskellElephant Jun 20 '11 at 14:17
    
@HaskellElephant: I removed the 2 methods and put the code that goes in there. I've simplified it a lot by removing unnecessary code. You can replace dt by any value, it does not matter. Thanks –  vis Jun 20 '11 at 14:30
1  
@HaskellElephant: Are you sure that your two loops actually do the same thing? After all, the loop may read values arr that have already been updated. –  Heinrich Apfelmus Jun 20 '11 at 14:41
    
The two loops you have provided are NOT equivalent making it rather difficult to analyse what you are trying to do. Check out the C code snippet. I know your code is in Java but Java is not an option at codepad. –  Anupam Jain Jun 20 '11 at 15:24
    
@HaskellElephant,Anupam: you were right, the code did not give equivalent results. My fault. I was just trying to simplify the code I have, but now the code is more complete and if you check, both loops give the same result EXCEPT the first one is a 'triangular' loop while the second is a full nested loop. –  vis Jun 20 '11 at 15:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a straightforward translation using unboxed mutable vectors from the vector package. Code is somewhat ugly, but should be very fast:

module Main
    where

import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed as U
import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed.Mutable as M

numElts :: Int
numElts = 10

dt :: Double
dt = 0.001

loop :: Int -> M.IOVector Double -> M.IOVector Double 
        -> M.IOVector Double -> IO ()
loop n x v m = go 0
  where
    doWork i j = do xI <- M.read x i
                    xJ <- M.read x j
                    vI <- M.read v i
                    vJ <- M.read v j
                    mI <- M.read m i
                    mJ <- M.read m j

                    let d = xI - xJ
                    let sqr = d * d + 0.01
                    let dist = sqrt sqr
                    let mag = dt / (sqr * dist)

                    M.write v i (vI - d * mJ * mag)
                    M.write v j (vJ + d * mI * mag)

    go i | i < n     = do go' (i+1)
                          go  (i+1)
         | otherwise = return ()
      where
        go' j | j < n     = do doWork i j
                               go' (j + 1)
              | otherwise = return ()

main :: IO ()
main = do x <- generateVector 0.5
          v <- generateVector 2.5
          m <- generateVector 5.5
          loop numElts x v m
          v' <- U.unsafeFreeze v
          U.forM_ v' print

    where
      generateVector :: Double -> IO (M.IOVector Double)
      generateVector d = do v <- M.new numElts
                            generateVector' numElts d v
                            return v

      generateVector' :: Int -> Double -> M.IOVector Double -> IO ()
      generateVector' n d v = go 0
        where
          go i | i < n = do M.unsafeWrite v i (fromIntegral i * d)
                            go (i+1)
               | otherwise = return ()

Update: Regarding the "very fast" claim: I benchmarked my solution against the pure one provided by Federico and got the following results (for n = 1000):

benchmarking pureSolution
collecting 100 samples, 1 iterations each, in estimated 334.5483 s
mean: 2.949640 s, lb 2.867693 s, ub 3.005429 s, ci 0.950
std dev: 421.1978 ms, lb 343.8233 ms, ub 539.4906 ms, ci 0.950
found 4 outliers among 100 samples (4.0%)
  3 (3.0%) high severe
variance introduced by outliers: 5.997%
variance is slightly inflated by outliers

benchmarking pureVectorSolution
collecting 100 samples, 1 iterations each, in estimated 280.4593 s
mean: 2.747359 s, lb 2.709507 s, ub 2.803392 s, ci 0.950
std dev: 237.7489 ms, lb 179.3110 ms, ub 311.8813 ms, ci 0.950
found 13 outliers among 100 samples (13.0%)
  7 (7.0%) high mild
  6 (6.0%) high severe
variance introduced by outliers: 2.998%
variance is slightly inflated by outliers

benchmarking imperativeSolution
collecting 100 samples, 1 iterations each, in estimated 5.905104 s
mean: 58.59154 ms, lb 56.79405 ms, ub 60.60033 ms, ci 0.950
std dev: 11.70101 ms, lb 9.120100 ms, ub NaN s, ci 0.950

So the imperative solution is approx. 50 times faster than the functional one (the difference is even more dramatic for smaller n, when everything fits in cache). I tried to make Federico's solution work with unboxed vectors, but apparently it relies on laziness in a crucial way, which makes the unboxed version loop forever. The "pure vector" version uses boxed vectors.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mikhail. The mutable unboxed vector module is new to me. How do i actually print/get back the result in the main function? I mean the updated vector. –  vis Jun 20 '11 at 16:03
    
I've updated the code. –  Mikhail Glushenkov Jun 20 '11 at 16:13
    
I will get this to work with my existing code and see how it goes. But I would like to see how this can be implemented using immutable array or just list in haskell. That would definitely require accumulating the changes and then finally applying it to the initial array/list. –  vis Jun 20 '11 at 16:22
    
I'm not sure that a purely functional solution can be as fast as an imperative one in this case. Destructive update and constant-time indexing are central to your algorithm. –  Mikhail Glushenkov Jun 21 '11 at 0:45
1  
@Peaker Removed calls to unsafeThaw. –  Mikhail Glushenkov Jun 21 '11 at 2:06

I'm not sure this solves your problem because I didn't grasp it completely yet, but the triangular loop itself is very easy to do in Haskell:

triangularLoop :: (a -> a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
triangularLoop f xs = do
    (x1 : t) <- tails xs
    x2 <- t
    return $ f x1 x2

Or, written without the monadic syntax,

triangularLoop f = concat . map singlePass . tails
    where
        singlePass [] = []
        singlePass (h:t) = map (f h) t
share|improve this answer

A typical, idiomatic way of writing nested loops in Haskell is using list comprehensions.

Here is how I would translate your code:

import Data.Array

import Data.List (tails)

data Body = Body {x::Double,v::Double,m::Double}
            deriving Show

n::Int
n = 9

dt::Double
dt = 0.001

bs_0 :: Array Int Body
bs_0 = array (0,n) [(i,Body {x = i'*0.5,v = i'*2.5,m = i'*5.5}) | 
                    i <- [0..n], let i' = fromIntegral i]

bs :: Array Int Body
bs = accum (\b dv -> b {v = v b + dv}) bs_0 dvs
     where 
       dvs :: [(Int,Double)]
       dvs = concat [[(i,dv_i),(j,dv_j)] | (i:is) <- tails [0..n], 
                                            j <- is,
                                            let d = x(bs!i) - x(bs!j)
                                                sqr =  d * d + 0.01
                                                dist = sqrt sqr
                                                mag = dt / (sqr * dist)
                                                dv_i = -d * m(bs!j) * mag
                                                dv_j =  d * m(bs!i) * mag]

main :: IO()
main = mapM_ print (assocs bs)
share|improve this answer
    
This produces wrong results. See gist.github.com/1038315 –  Mikhail Glushenkov Jun 21 '11 at 16:59
    
Thanks, corrected. –  Federico Squartini Jun 21 '11 at 17:29
    
FYI, I benchmarked your code. The imperative solution is much faster; I couldn't get your code to work with unboxed vectors, however. –  Mikhail Glushenkov Jun 22 '11 at 0:19

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