Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I do not know if what I am asking is doable, stupid or simple. I've only recently started dwelling in template functions and classes, and I was wondering if the following scenario is possible: A class which holds a function pointer to be called. The function pointer cannot be specific, but abstract, so that whenever the class's Constructor is called, it may accept different kinds of function pointers. When the class's execute function is called, it executes the function pointer allocated at construction, with an argument (or arguments). Basically the abstraction is kept throughout the design, and left over the user on what function pointer and arguments to pass. The following code has not been tested, just to demonstrate what I'm trying to do:

void (*foo)(double);
void (*bar)(double,double);
void (*blah)(float);

class Instruction
{
    protected:
      double var_a;
      double var_b;
      void (*ptr2func)(double);
      void (*ptr2func)(double,double);  
    public:
      template <typename F> Instruction(F arg1, F arg2, F arg3)
      {
         Instruction::ptr2func = &arg1;
         var_a = arg2;
         var_b = arg3;
      };    
      void execute()
      {
         (*ptr2func)(var_a);
      };
};

I do not like the fact I have to keep a list inside the class of possible overloadable function pointers. How could I possibly improve the above to generalize it as much as possible so that it can work with any kind of function pointer thrown at it ? Bear in mind, I will want to keep a container of those instantiated objects and execute each function pointer in sequence. Thank you ! Edit: Maybe the class should be a template it'self in order to facilitate use with many different function pointers? Edit2: I found a way around my problem just for future reference, don't know if it's the right one, but it works:

class Instruction
{
  protected:
    double arg1,arg2,arg3;
  public:
    virtual void execute() = 0;
};

template <class F> class MoveArm : public Instruction
{
  private:
    F (func);    
  public:
   template <typename T> 
   MoveArm(const T& f,double a, double b)
   {
     arg1 = a;
     arg2 = b;
     func = &f;
   };

   void execute()
   {
     (func)(arg1,arg2);
   };
};

However when importing functions, their function pointers need to be typedef'd:

void doIt(double a, double b)
{
   std::cout << "moving arm at: " << a << " " << b << std::endl;
};

typedef void (*ptr2func)(double,double);

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

   MoveArm<ptr2func>  arm(doIt,0.5,2.3);
   arm.execute();

   return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
boost::function and boost::bind if you want template functors? –  AJG85 Jun 20 '11 at 14:17
    
seems like you are re-inventing boost::function: boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/doc/html/function/… –  Nim Jun 20 '11 at 14:18
1  
To me it sounds like he wants to hold function pointers/objects with an arbitrary signature; that's not something what boost::function does. You should look into using std::bind / boost::bind for creating a functor that wraps the arguments. –  reko_t Jun 20 '11 at 14:22
    
I did not know boost already had this feature, but even if so, I still want to understand how this is done. Will look into boost to see how it works. Thank you. –  Alex Jun 20 '11 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you can use C++0x and variadic templates, you can achieve this by using combination of std::function, std::bind and perfect forwarding:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

template <typename Result = void>
class instruction
{
public:
        template <typename Func, typename... Args>
        instruction(Func func, Args&&... args)
        {
                m_func = std::bind(func, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
        }

        Result execute()
        {
                return m_func();
        }
private:
        std::function<Result ()> m_func;
};

double add(double a, double b)
{
        return (a + b);
}

int main()
{
        instruction<double> test(&add, 1.5, 2.0);
        std::cout << "result: " << test.execute() << std::endl;
}

Example with output: http://ideone.com/9HYWo

In C++ 98/03, you'd unfortunately need to overload the constructor for up-to N-paramters yourself if you need to support variable-number of arguments. You'd also use boost::function and boost::bind instead of the std:: equivalents. And then there's also the issue of forwarding problem, so to do perfect forwarding you'd need to do an exponential amount of overloads depending on the amount of arguments you need to support. Boost has a preprocessor library that you can use to generate the required overloads without having to write all the overloads manually; but that is quite complex.

Here's an example of how to do it with C++98/03, assuming the functions you pass to the instruction won't need to take the arguments by modifiable reference, to do that, you also need to have overloads for P1& p1 instead of just const P1& p1.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>

template <typename Result = void>
class instruction
{
public:
        template <typename Func>
        instruction(Func func)
        {
                m_func = func;
        }

        template <typename Func, typename P1>
        instruction(Func func, const P1& p1)
        {
                m_func = boost::bind(func, p1);
        }

        template <typename Func, typename P1, typename P2>
        instruction(Func func, const P1& p1, const P2& p2)
        {
                m_func = boost::bind(func, p1, p2);
        }

        template <typename Func, typename P1, typename P2, typename P3>
        instruction(Func func, const P1& p1, const P2& p2, const P3& p3)
        {
                m_func = boost::bind(func, p1, p2, p3);
        }

        Result execute()
        {
                return m_func();
        }
private:
        boost::function<Result ()> m_func;
};

double add(double a, double b)
{
        return (a + b);
}

int main()
{
        instruction<double> test(&add, 1.5, 2.0);
        std::cout << "result: " << test.execute() << std::endl;
}

Example: http://ideone.com/iyXp1

share|improve this answer
    
I am looking at maximum three arguments, usually floats or doubles, so I am not that much concerned with the number of parameters. I am concerned with function signatures and return types. –  Alex Jun 20 '11 at 14:42
    
Do you ever need to take the parameters by non-const reference, or are they always passed by value or a const reference? If you don't need to support non-const references, you only need as many overloads as the number of arguments you need to support (which would be 3 in your case). –  reko_t Jun 20 '11 at 14:43
    
Usually by value, pointer or const reference. In any case I can have three (or four) overloaded constructors for each case. My question is this: when a function pointer returns something (a bool or a double) how will I know about this ? Some of the functions are void, others do return something. What do I do in this case? –  Alex Jun 20 '11 at 14:51
1  
I modified the C++0x example to show how to deal with the return value, as well as added an example for C++98/03 to show it for up-to 3 arguments. –  reko_t Jun 20 '11 at 14:55
    
Thank you very much ! I will probably end up using this, but just out of curiosity, can't I make a template abstract base class to use for allocating the function pointer, and from there use it to overload inherited classes constructors with the parameters ? –  Alex Jun 20 '11 at 15:05

I also created a C++0x version with some example usage. You can probably better use the one given by reko_t but I nevertheless post this one. This one uses recursion to unpack a tuple with values, and thus a tuple to store the arguments to pass to the function. Note that this one does not use perfect forwarding. If you use this, you probably want to add this.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <tuple>

using namespace std;

template<unsigned N>
struct FunctionCaller
{
    template<typename ... Typenames, typename ... Args>
    static void call(void (*func)(Typenames ...), tuple<Typenames ...> tuple, Args ... args)
    {
        FunctionCaller<N-1>::call(func, tuple, get<N-1>(tuple), args ...);
    }
};

template<>
struct FunctionCaller<0u>
{
    template<typename ... Typenames, typename ... Args>
    static void call(void (*func)(Typenames ...), tuple<Typenames ...> tuple, Args ... args)
    {
        func(args ...);
    }
};

template<typename ... Typenames>
class Instruction
{
    public:
    typedef void (*FuncType)(Typenames ...);

    protected:
    std::tuple<Typenames ...> d_args;
    FuncType d_function;

    public:
    Instruction(FuncType function, Typenames ... args):
        d_args(args ...),
        d_function(function)
    {
    }

    void execute()
    {
        FunctionCaller<sizeof...(Typenames)>::call(d_function, d_args);
    }
};

void test1()
{
    cout << "Hello World" << endl;
}

void test2(int a, string b, double c)
{
    cout << a << b << c << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Instruction<> i1(test1);
    Instruction<int, string, double> i2(test2, 5, "/2 = ", 2.5);
    i1.execute();
    i2.execute();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great example of how you can pass and store an arbitrary number of arguments and unpack them at later time. But is there any reason not to pass the parameter pack by rvalue reference to avoid unnecessary copying? Or were you writing this under the assumption that it'll only be used with types like float and double like the OP mentioned. –  reko_t Jun 20 '11 at 16:56

Well, what you are doing is correct. But since all pointers have the same size in C++ you can store one pointer (of void type):

void *funcptr;

and cast it to the necessary type when needed:

static_cast<(*void)(double,double)>(funcptr)(var_a, var_b);

But please, only use this when better techniques can not be used, but I can not tell if you don't tell us the bigger picture.


You might want to look at boost::function.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this defeat the point of generality because I need to know what to cast into depending on the function pointer used ? I would rather avoid using void pointers. –  Alex Jun 20 '11 at 14:33
    
The bigger picture is to create a framework for reinforcement learning in robots, but in order to make it as simple and reusable as possible, I have to keep it generic. The function pointers are usually pointers to API calls, and because there is a huge variation in the controller functions this creates a problem. Ideally the instruction would be able to take as a parameter any function pointer pointing to an api function, which usually have from zero up to three parameters. Then another class, Action would contain instructions related to a state, and so on... –  Alex Jun 20 '11 at 14:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.