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What is the best way to share one function between two different event handlers? I want the same outcome but some situation dependent variables will need to be defined within the function depending on which element was clicked.

I could hack a solution but want to know the best practice for such a scenario. Simple problem must have a simple answer...

EXAMPLE

var onMyEvent = function(e){
    if(click triggered from 'a'){
        //do that 
    }  
    if(click triggered from 'div'){
        //do that
    } 
}


$('a').click(onMyEvent);
$('div').click(onMyEvent);

FIDDLE: http://jsfiddle.net/f6C92/

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I guess there'd be several ways to achieve this, such as checking the e variable for target objects, etc, but for your scenario, the easiest and most readable would be using the is() function, to which you can pass any CSS selector to test if the object of interest matches it.

var onMyEvent = function(e){
    if($(this).is('a')){
        //do that 
    }  
    if($(this).is('div')){
        //do that
    } 
}


$('a').click(onMyEvent);
$('div').click(onMyEvent);

There are those who would argue that the above takes an unnecessary round-trip to jQuery, when you could achieve the same by testing this.tagName == 'A', but I usually recommend to delegate these things to jQuery as well, for browser compatibility reasons.

Another neat way would be to pass the relevant information as event data:

var onMyEvent = function(e){
    if(e.data.type == 'a'){
        //do that 
    }  
    ...
}


$('a').click({ type: 'a' }, onMyEvent);
$('div').click({ type: 'div' }, onMyEvent);
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Is that the best practice for such a situation? –  wilsonpage Jun 20 '11 at 14:35
    
I was looking for something very neat like var a = b || c; –  wilsonpage Jun 20 '11 at 14:36
1  
@pagewil: Nope, it's not, but again, you are not trying to go after best practices, because if you were, you would separate the same functionality out of that function. Then, pass the element to the function, not the event. –  Shef Jun 20 '11 at 14:38
1  
@shef you mean like @kingjiv's example? –  wilsonpage Jun 20 '11 at 14:42
    
@pagewil: Yes! I am just curious, why would you be listening for a click event on a div element? You are not considering a no-JS fallback, are you? –  Shef Jun 20 '11 at 14:45

It depends how complicated the differences are, but I don't really like checking element type in the handler. I would probably do something like this:

function doSomething(...){
  // do stuff
}


$('a').click(function(){
   // set some variables and send them as parameters to doSomething
   doSomething(...);
});

$('div').click(function(){
   // set some variables and send them as parameters to doSomething
   doSomething(...);
});

Where doSomething contains the common code.

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The target property of the event will contain the element that was clicked. In this updated fiddle, I alert the id of the clicked element, using e.target.id.

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This ought to do the trick:

var onMyEvent = function(e) {
    if (this.tagName == "A") {
       alert("a");   
    } else if (this.tagName == "DIV") {
        alert("div"); 
    }
}
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var onMyEvent = function(e){
    if(this.tagName == 'A'){
       alert("a");
    }  
    if(this.tagName == 'DIV'){
       alert("div");
    } 
}

$('a').click(onMyEvent);
$('div').click(onMyEvent);

Even if this will work in my opinion it's better to set a different handler for each tag, and call the same function inside it, like kingjiv suggested

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