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I want to know if this is correct.

$('.myfilter').focus(function(){
    var length = $(this).val().length; 
    if (length == 0) {
        dosomething
    }
}).blur(function(length){
    if (length == 0) {
        dowhatever
            }
})

Above i've simplified my code, im just checking if length == 0 on focus and blur for my input. notice how I declared length in focus, but not in blur, but i added the variable name inside .blur(function(length){. Is this the better way to get length accessible in .blur without having to re-declare var length = $(this).val().length; in .blur?

as opposed to this:

$('.myfilter').focus(function(){
    var length = $(this).val().length; 
    if (length == 0) {
        dosomething
    }
})

$('.myfilter').blur(function(length){
    var length = $(this).val().length;
    if (length == 0) {
        dowhatever
            }
})

the first code block is the better way to do this?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about not declaring any variables at all... :)

$('.myfilter').focus(function() {
    if ( this.value.length === 0 ) {
        dosomething();
    }
}).blur(function(length) {
    if ( this.value.length === 0 ) {
        dowhatever();
    }
});

Also, this:

$('.myfilter').bind('focus blur', function(e) {
    if ( this.value.length === 0 ) {
        e.type === 'focus' ? dosomething() : dowhatever();
    }
});

Using variables

Usually you want to use a variable if you need to use a certain value multiple times. However, in this case, you need the this.value.length value only once (in the if-header). Therefore, you can directly inject this value inside the if-header.

$(this) vs this

In order to understand when to use which, you need to understand the difference between a DOM element object and a jQuery object. A jQuery object is a wrapper object which contains zero or more DOM element objects (like an array). It is important to understand that you can only call jQuery methods (like .addClass()) on jQuery objects, not DOM elements directly.

Inside event handler functions, the this value refers to the DOM element at which the event fired. Now, if you want to call jQuery methods on that DOM element, you need to wrap that DOM element inside a jQuery object - you do this by writing $(this).

$(this).addClass('selected'); // works fine
this.addClass('selected'); // throws Error
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i'm obviously still learning js and jquery and what should be done/shouldn't. I thought variables should be used because it's faster? then again I don't always see how it could be that much faster, but I'd like to learn about efficiency and etc. Could you also tell me, in Jquery, when can I use this as opposed to $(this)? –  android.nick Jun 26 '11 at 5:23
    
@android I've updated my answer. –  Šime Vidas Jun 26 '11 at 11:53
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What I would normally do, if you don't want to recapture length, is store length in a property on this and then read it in the blur event, like so:

$('.myfilter').focus(function(){
    this.val_length = $(this).val().length; 
    if (this.val_length == 0) {
        dosomething
    }
}).blur(function(){
    if (this.val_length == 0) {
        dowhatever
    }
})
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there's really no need to store it - for input elements the value is a native property of this so it's trivially obtained. –  Alnitak Jun 20 '11 at 15:23
1  
obviously. But as it was obvious, I assumed the OP is just using this as a stand-in for a more complex value calculation. –  Guss Jun 20 '11 at 15:59
    
could you explain "store length in a property on this" or where I could read more about it? I see your example, but I didn't know you could do that, and i'm wondering how other people use it. –  android.nick Jun 26 '11 at 5:18
    
both actions are called "in the context of" the object with the class name "myfilter". In Javascript, "in the context of" is represented by the automatic variable this. You can access data in properties of the this object in either method because this means the same object in both calls. –  Guss Jun 26 '11 at 20:01
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The first code block won't work - the passed parameter to .blur() will actually be the event that triggered the blur call.

Also note that there's no need to use jQuery to obtain the value, it's a direct property of this (for input elements):

$('.myfilter').blur(function(ev) {
    if (this.value.length === 0) {
        // dowhatever
    }
});
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In either case it won't work because the event handler gets called with the event object as the first parameter and not some arbitrary value, even if its labeled with the "correct" name. –  Guss Jun 20 '11 at 15:17
    
in the second one it'll work, except that the incorrectly labelled length parameter (containing the event object) will be overwritten with the internally scoped variable. –  Alnitak Jun 20 '11 at 15:18
    
Ah, yes - I didn't notice that the second case has the var length recapture the length and obscure the incorrectly named argument. –  Guss Jun 20 '11 at 15:22
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