Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a string:

string mystring = "34234234d124";

I want to get the last 4 characters of this string which is "d124". I can use SubString, but it needs a couple of line of codes. Is it possible to get this result in on expression with C#?

share|improve this question
21  
Sure it's not just one line? –  BoltClock Jun 20 '11 at 15:23
2  
What do you want when there are fewer than 4 characters? –  agent-j Jun 20 '11 at 15:30
    
Please let us know how did you the approach.. People arent here to solve some classroom assignments! –  letsc Jun 20 '11 at 15:33
    
@Joe Agree fully! –  Konrad Viltersten Mar 27 '13 at 20:45
4  
4 > mystring.length ? mystring : mystring.Substring(mystring.length -4); –  Jodrell Apr 26 '13 at 13:53

13 Answers 13

You can use extension

public static class StringExtension
{
    public static string GetLast(this string source, int tail_length)
    {
       if(tail_length >= source.Length)
          return source;
       return source.Substring(source.Length - tail_length);
    }
}

And then call

string mystring = "34234234d124";
string res = mystring.GetLast(4); 
share|improve this answer
4  
I like this, but I would probably just call it Last(). After all Substring() isn't GetSubstring(). –  Buh Buh Jun 20 '11 at 15:44
    
Thanks for the reminder that I can use an extension method to make my code look prettier! –  Ed Schwehm Apr 5 '12 at 19:31
    
its a lot longer than 1 line. –  Jodrell Apr 26 '13 at 13:46
1  
Maybe call it Tail() as Last clashes with the Linq Extension Last(). –  Craig Curtis Jan 22 at 1:17
mystring.Substring(Math.Max(0, mystring.Length - 4)); //how many lines is this?
share|improve this answer
7  
Also, it'll fail if mystring is less than 4 chars long. –  George Duckett Jun 20 '11 at 15:25
    
@George: better? :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 20 '11 at 15:27
2  
+1 because i think yours is slightly more readable than @dtb's –  George Duckett Jun 20 '11 at 15:29
    
Taking a couple of lines of code (which the OP already knew) and cramming it onto one line is not really the same thing as one expression. –  Buh Buh Jun 20 '11 at 15:39
    
I like it. Simple and elegant and takes the max so if your string is less than 0 you won't get an out of index exception. –  Bretticus Mar 13 '13 at 16:39

Using Substring is actually quite short and readable:

 var result = mystring.Substring(mystring.Length - Math.Min(4, mystring.Length));
 // result == "d124"
share|improve this answer
    
safe, but ugly. I concur: I'd write this across two lines at minimum –  sehe Jun 20 '11 at 15:27
9  
Readable? Are you sure? –  Buh Buh Jun 20 '11 at 15:35
string mystring = "34234234d124";
mystring = mystring.Substring(mystring.Length-4)
share|improve this answer

Ok, so I see this is an old post, but why are we rewriting code that is already provided in the framework?

I would suggest that you add a reference to the framework DLL "Microsoft.VisualBasic"

using Microsoft.VisualBasic;
//...

string value = Strings.Right("34234234d124", 4);
share|improve this answer
2  
Nice example of a time to use the VB functionality –  Brian White Mar 18 '13 at 16:25
2  
I love you. Most of my programming experience is VB, so finding out that I can use all of those functions that I'm so familiar with is awesome –  Ben Strombeck Sep 1 '13 at 1:39
1  
I can never figure out if using MS.VB a good idea -- why is it shunted into the VisualBasic namespace? TextFieldParser is another example. Why are these utilities factored so strangely? –  ruffin May 12 at 18:26
    
@ruffin: Essentially these were all VB6 built-in functions. They were implemented initially in the framework to make upgrading VB6 code easier. That said, there are many useful utility functions from VB6 that I like to use and being they are now part of the .NET framework, I can continue to leverage them in my C# code. –  RJ Programmer May 23 at 15:54
1  
I feel like this should be the accepted answer. Why re-invent the wheel? –  Zack Aug 4 at 16:54

It isn't just this?

int count = 4;
string sub = mystring.Substring(mystring.Length - count, count);
share|improve this answer

realize it is an old thread, wanted to share my version, as one of the suggested above seems to be incomplete, IMHO.

The main difference is that this piece of code takes into consideration when the input string is a) null b) longer than or matching the requested length c) shorter than the requested length.

Here it is:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string Right(this string str, int length)
    {
        return str.Substring(str.Length - length, length);
    }

    public static string MyLast(this string str, int length)
    {
        if (str == null)
            return null;
        else if (str.Length >= length)
            return str.Substring(str.Length - length, length);
        else
            return str;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
mystring = mystring.Length > 4 ? mystring.Substring(mystring.Length - 4, 4) : mystring;
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but I think that you meant = not =+. –  dotancohen Jul 17 '12 at 4:23

This won't fail for any length string.

string mystring = "34234234d124";
string last4 = Regex.Match(mystring, "(?!.{5}).*").Value;
// last4 = "d124"
last4 = Regex.Match("d12", "(?!.{5}).*").Value;
// last4 = "d12"

This is probably overkill for the task at hand, but if there needs to be additional validation, it can possibly be added to the regular expression.

Edit: I think this regex would be more efficient:

@".{4}\Z"
share|improve this answer
1  
Definitely overkill. I would stick with simple string methods for this. –  tsells Jan 16 at 14:49

Here is another alternative that shouldn't perform too badly (because of deferred execution):

new string(mystring.Reverse().Take(4).Reverse().ToArray());

Although an extension method for the purpose mystring.Last(4) is clearly the cleanest solution, albeit a bit more work.

share|improve this answer
    
Why did this get voted down? –  Brian White Mar 18 '13 at 16:26
1  
@BrianWhite People are cranky after new year's? –  Konrad Viltersten Mar 27 '13 at 20:48
    
Nice solution. i like it. But you forgot other Reverse to get correct string. Must be: new string(mystring.Reverse().Take(4).Reverse().ToArray()); –  ymorales Apr 30 '13 at 18:45
    
Aah yes, you are correct - my mental compiler didn't think that far. Sadly that makes it appear even worse! :) –  Andre Luus May 2 '13 at 6:59

Why this much convoluted solutions, Simple solution would be,

string mystring = "34234234d124";
string last4 = mystring.Substring(mystring.Length - 4, 4);
share|improve this answer

How about a generic Last<T>? That will work with ANY IEnumerable, including string.

    public static IEnumerable<T> Last<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, int nLastElements)
    {
        int count = Math.Min(enumerable.Count(), nLastElements);
        for (int i = enumerable.Count() - count; i < enumerable.Count(); i++)
        {
            yield return enumerable.ElementAt(i);
        }
    }

And a specific one for string:

    public static string Right(this string str, int nLastElements)
    {
        return new string(str.Last(nLastElements).ToArray());
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. Overkill. Maybe something like enumerable.Skip(enumerable.Count() - nLastElements) ? –  Buh Buh Jun 20 '11 at 16:03
    
I disagree with @BuhBuh about this being overkill. But I prefer "Last" to "Right" as a name. I am a bit squeamish about overloading the existing Last of IEnumerable<T>. I'm kind of leaning towards "Skip," too. –  user742667 Feb 26 '13 at 22:27

I threw together some code modified from various sources that will get the results you want, and do a lot more besides. I've allowed for negative int values, int values that exceed the length of the string, and for end index being less than the start index. In that last case, the method returns a reverse-order substring. There are plenty of comments, but let me know if anything is unclear or just crazy. I was playing around with this to see what all I might use it for.

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns characters slices from string between two indexes.
    /// 
    /// If start or end are negative, their indexes will be calculated counting 
    /// back from the end of the source string. 
    /// If the end param is less than the start param, the Slice will return a 
    /// substring in reverse order.
    /// 
    /// <param name="source">String the extension method will operate upon.</param>
    /// <param name="startIndex">Starting index, may be negative.</param>
    /// <param name="endIndex">Ending index, may be negative).</param>
    /// </summary>
    public static string Slice(this string source, int startIndex, int endIndex = int.MaxValue)
    {
        // If startIndex or endIndex exceeds the length of the string they will be set 
        // to zero if negative, or source.Length if positive.
        if (source.ExceedsLength(startIndex)) startIndex = startIndex < 0 ? 0 : source.Length;
        if (source.ExceedsLength(endIndex)) endIndex = endIndex < 0 ? 0 : source.Length;

        // Negative values count back from the end of the source string.
        if (startIndex < 0) startIndex = source.Length + startIndex;
        if (endIndex < 0) endIndex = source.Length + endIndex;         

        // Calculate length of characters to slice from string.
        int length = Math.Abs(endIndex - startIndex);
        // If the endIndex is less than the startIndex, return a reversed substring.
        if (endIndex < startIndex) return source.Substring(endIndex, length).Reverse();

        return source.Substring(startIndex, length);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Reverses character order in a string.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="source"></param>
    /// <returns>string</returns>
    public static string Reverse(this string source)
    {
        char[] charArray = source.ToCharArray();
        Array.Reverse(charArray);
        return new string(charArray);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Verifies that the index is within the range of the string source.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="source"></param>
    /// <param name="index"></param>
    /// <returns>bool</returns>
    public static bool ExceedsLength(this string source, int index)
    {
        return Math.Abs(index) > source.Length ? true : false;
    }

So if you have a string like "This is an extension method", here are some examples and results to expect.

var s = "This is an extension method";
// If you want to slice off end characters, just supply a negative startIndex value
// but no endIndex value (or an endIndex value >= to the source string length).
Console.WriteLine(s.Slice(-5));
// Returns "ethod".
Console.WriteLine(s.Slice(-5, 10));
// Results in a startIndex of 22 (counting 5 back from the end).
// Since that is greater than the endIndex of 10, the result is reversed.
// Returns "m noisnetxe"
Console.WriteLine(s.Slice(2, 15));
// Returns "is is an exte"

Hopefully this version is helpful to someone. It operates just like normal if you don't use any negative numbers, and provides defaults for out of range params.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.