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Right now I have a central module in a framework that spawns multiple processes using the Python 2.6 multiprocessing module. Because it uses multiprocessing, there is module-level multiprocessing-aware log, LOG = multiprocessing.get_logger(). Per the docs, this logger has process-shared locks so that you don't garble things up in sys.stderr (or whatever filehandle) by having multiple processes writing to it simultaneously.

The issue I have now is that the other modules in the framework are not multiprocessing-aware. The way I see it, I need to make all dependencies on this central module use multiprocessing-aware logging. That's annoying within the framework, let alone for all clients of the framework. Are there alternatives I'm not thinking of?

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The docs you link to, state the exact opposite of what you say, the logger has no process shared locks and things get mixed up - a problem I had as well. –  Sebastian Blask Jan 12 '12 at 10:51
2  
see examples in the stdlib docs: Logging to a single file from multiple processes. The recipes doesn't require other modules to be multiprocessing-aware. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 2 '12 at 23:05
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11 Answers 11

up vote 24 down vote accepted

The only way to deal with this non-intrusively is to spawn each worker process such that its log goes to a different file descriptor (to disk or to pipe.) Ideally, all log entries should be timestamped. Your controller process can then (if using disk files) coalesce the log files at the end of the run (sorting by timestamp) or, if using pipes (recommended approach), coalesce log entries on-the-fly from all pipes into a central log (e.g. periodically select from the pipes' fd's, perform merge-sort on the available log entries, flush to centralized log, repeat.)

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Nice, that was 35s before I thought of that (thought I'd use atexit :-). Problem is that it won't give you a realtime readout. This may be part of the price of multiprocessing as opposed to multithreading. –  cdleary Mar 13 '09 at 4:41
    
@cdleary, using the piped approach it would be as near-realtime as one can get (especially if stderr is not buffered in the spawned processes.) –  vladr Mar 13 '09 at 4:46
    
+1 I had this general thought too. I especially like your on-the-fly idea. –  bernie Mar 13 '09 at 5:01
    
Okay, but then wouldn't you need the coalescer process to be a central dispatcher that gave each child process a new shared stderr pipe? That would mean that people couldn't use the libraries traditionally, but would have to hand a callback over to the coalescer/dispatcher. –  cdleary Mar 13 '09 at 5:06
4  
Why not just use a multiprocessing.Queue and a logging thread in the main process instead? Seems simpler. –  Brandon Rhodes May 3 '10 at 19:02
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How about delegating all the logging to another process that reads all log entries from a Queue?

LOG_QUEUE = multiprocessing.JoinableQueue()

class CentralLogger(multiprocessing.Process):
    def __init__(self, queue):
        multiprocessing.Process.__init__(self)
        self.queue = queue
        self.log = logger.getLogger('some_config')
        self.log.info("Started Central Logging process")

    def run(self):
        while True:
            log_level, message = self.queue.get()
            if log_level is None:
                self.log.info("Shutting down Central Logging process")
                break
            else:
                self.log.log(log_level, message)

central_logger_process = CentralLogger(LOG_QUEUE)
central_logger_process.start()

Simply share LOG_QUEUE via any of the multiprocess mechanisms or even inheritance and it all works out fine!

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All current solutions are too coupled to the logging configuration by using a handler. My solution has the following architecture and features:

  • You can use any logging configuration you want
  • Logging is done in a daemon thread
  • Safe shutdown of the daemon by using a context manager
  • Communication to the logging thread is done by multiprocessing.Queue
  • In subprocesses, logging.Logger (and already defined instances) are patched to send all records to the queue
  • New: format traceback and message before sending to queue to prevent pickling errors

Code with usage example and output can be found at the following Gist: https://gist.github.com/schlamar/7003737

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I just now wrote a log handler of my own that just feeds everything to the parent process via a pipe. I've only been testing it for ten minutes but it seems to work pretty well (note this is hardcoded to RotatingFileHandler, which is my own use case)

Updated. This now uses a queue for correct handling of concurrency, and also recovers from errors correctly. I've now been using this in production for several months and the current version below works without issue.

from logging.handlers import RotatingFileHandler
import multiprocessing, threading, logging, sys, traceback

class MultiProcessingLog(logging.Handler):
    def __init__(self, name, mode, maxsize, rotate):
        logging.Handler.__init__(self)

        self._handler = RotatingFileHandler(name, mode, maxsize, rotate)
        self.queue = multiprocessing.Queue(-1)

        t = threading.Thread(target=self.receive)
        t.daemon = True
        t.start()

    def setFormatter(self, fmt):
        logging.Handler.setFormatter(self, fmt)
        self._handler.setFormatter(fmt)

    def receive(self):
        while True:
            try:
                record = self.queue.get()
                self._handler.emit(record)
            except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
                raise
            except EOFError:
                break
            except:
                traceback.print_exc(file=sys.stderr)

    def send(self, s):
        self.queue.put_nowait(s)

    def _format_record(self, record):
        # ensure that exc_info and args
        # have been stringified.  Removes any chance of
        # unpickleable things inside and possibly reduces
        # message size sent over the pipe
        if record.args:
            record.msg = record.msg % record.args
            record.args = None
        if record.exc_info:
            dummy = self.format(record)
            record.exc_info = None

        return record

    def emit(self, record):
        try:
            s = self._format_record(record)
            self.send(s)
        except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
            raise
        except:
            self.handleError(record)

    def close(self):
        self._handler.close()
        logging.Handler.close(self)
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1  
One nit: you need to import traceback as well. –  Jason Baker Apr 2 '10 at 18:56
    
Is this code actually handling the problem? When you spawn off several processes using this handler, each process will have its own thread to check the queue and they write concurrently to the log file just like RotatingFileHandler would? Not only can log entries get mixed up, I also got stuff from different processes end up in different files as the rotation didn't seem to work well. Inspired by your solution though, I split the code, so I check on the queue in a thread that I start after spawning the processes. –  Sebastian Blask Jan 12 '12 at 11:01
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The above handler does all the file writing from the parent process and uses just one thread to receive messages passed from child processes. If you invoke the handler itself from a spawned child process then that's using it incorrectly, and you'll get all the same issues as RotatingFileHandler. I've used the above code for years with no issue. –  zzzeek Jan 12 '12 at 23:29
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Unfortunately this approach doesn't work on Windows. From docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html 16.6.2.12 "Note that on Windows child processes will only inherit the level of the parent process’s logger – any other customization of the logger will not be inherited." Subprocesses won't inherit the handler, and you can't pass it explicitly because it's not pickleable. –  Noah Yetter Mar 2 '12 at 4:16
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Could you add a simple example that shows initialization, as well as usage from a hypothetical child process? I'm not quite sure how the child process is supposed to get access to the queue without instantiating another instance of your class. –  JesseBuesking Apr 10 at 22:04
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I have a solution that's similar to ironhacker's except that I use logging.exception in some of my code and found that I needed to format the exception before passing it back over the Queue since tracebacks aren't pickle'able:

class QueueHandler(logging.Handler):
    def __init__(self, queue):
        logging.Handler.__init__(self)
        self.queue = queue
    def emit(self, record):
        if record.exc_info:
            # can't pass exc_info across processes so just format now
            record.exc_text = self.formatException(record.exc_info)
            record.exc_info = None
        self.queue.put(record)
    def formatException(self, ei):
        sio = cStringIO.StringIO()
        traceback.print_exception(ei[0], ei[1], ei[2], None, sio)
        s = sio.getvalue()
        sio.close()
        if s[-1] == "\n":
            s = s[:-1]
        return s
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I found a complete example along these lines here. –  Aryeh Leib Taurog Feb 27 '12 at 21:07
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A variant of the others that keeps the logging and queue thread separate.

"""sample code for logging in subprocesses using multiprocessing

* Little handler magic - The main process uses loggers and handlers as normal.
* Only a simple handler is needed in the subprocess that feeds the queue.
* Original logger name from subprocess is preserved when logged in main
  process.
* As in the other implementations, a thread reads the queue and calls the
  handlers. Except in this implementation, the thread is defined outside of a
  handler, which makes the logger definitions simpler.
* Works with multiple handlers.  If the logger in the main process defines
  multiple handlers, they will all be fed records generated by the
  subprocesses loggers.

tested with Python 2.5 and 2.6 on Linux and Windows

"""

import os
import sys
import time
import traceback
import multiprocessing, threading, logging, sys

DEFAULT_LEVEL = logging.DEBUG

formatter = logging.Formatter("%(levelname)s: %(asctime)s - %(name)s - %(process)s - %(message)s")

class SubProcessLogHandler(logging.Handler):
    """handler used by subprocesses

    It simply puts items on a Queue for the main process to log.

    """

    def __init__(self, queue):
        logging.Handler.__init__(self)
        self.queue = queue

    def emit(self, record):
        self.queue.put(record)

class LogQueueReader(threading.Thread):
    """thread to write subprocesses log records to main process log

    This thread reads the records written by subprocesses and writes them to
    the handlers defined in the main process's handlers.

    """

    def __init__(self, queue):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.queue = queue
        self.daemon = True

    def run(self):
        """read from the queue and write to the log handlers

        The logging documentation says logging is thread safe, so there
        shouldn't be contention between normal logging (from the main
        process) and this thread.

        Note that we're using the name of the original logger.

        """
        # Thanks Mike for the error checking code.
        while True:
            try:
                record = self.queue.get()
                # get the logger for this record
                logger = logging.getLogger(record.name)
                logger.callHandlers(record)
            except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
                raise
            except EOFError:
                break
            except:
                traceback.print_exc(file=sys.stderr)

class LoggingProcess(multiprocessing.Process):

    def __init__(self, queue):
        multiprocessing.Process.__init__(self)
        self.queue = queue

    def _setupLogger(self):
        # create the logger to use.
        logger = logging.getLogger('test.subprocess')
        # The only handler desired is the SubProcessLogHandler.  If any others
        # exist, remove them. In this case, on Unix and Linux the StreamHandler
        # will be inherited.

        for handler in logger.handlers:
            # just a check for my sanity
            assert not isinstance(handler, SubProcessLogHandler)
            logger.removeHandler(handler)
        # add the handler
        handler = SubProcessLogHandler(self.queue)
        handler.setFormatter(formatter)
        logger.addHandler(handler)

        # On Windows, the level will not be inherited.  Also, we could just
        # set the level to log everything here and filter it in the main
        # process handlers.  For now, just set it from the global default.
        logger.setLevel(DEFAULT_LEVEL)
        self.logger = logger

    def run(self):
        self._setupLogger()
        logger = self.logger
        # and here goes the logging
        p = multiprocessing.current_process()
        logger.info('hello from process %s with pid %s' % (p.name, p.pid))


if __name__ == '__main__':
    # queue used by the subprocess loggers
    queue = multiprocessing.Queue()
    # Just a normal logger
    logger = logging.getLogger('test')
    handler = logging.StreamHandler()
    handler.setFormatter(formatter)
    logger.addHandler(handler)
    logger.setLevel(DEFAULT_LEVEL)
    logger.info('hello from the main process')
    # This thread will read from the subprocesses and write to the main log's
    # handlers.
    log_queue_reader = LogQueueReader(queue)
    log_queue_reader.start()
    # create the processes.
    for i in range(10):
        p = LoggingProcess(queue)
        p.start()
    # The way I read the multiprocessing warning about Queue, joining a
    # process before it has finished feeding the Queue can cause a deadlock.
    # Also, Queue.empty() is not realiable, so just make sure all processes
    # are finished.
    # active_children joins subprocesses when they're finished.
    while multiprocessing.active_children():
        time.sleep(.1)
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I like an idea of fetching logger name from queue record. This allows to use conventional fileConfig() in MainProcess and a barely configured logger in PoolWorkers (with only setLevel(logging.NOTSET)). As I mentioned in another comment, I'm using Pool so I had to obtain my Queue (proxy) from Manager instead of multiprocessing so it can be pickled. This allows me to pass queue to a worker inside of a dictionary (most of which is derived from argsparse object using vars()). I feel like in the end this is the best approach for MS Windows that lacks fork() and breaks @zzzeak solution. –  mlt Oct 2 '13 at 22:01
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I also like zzzeek's answer but Andre is correct that a queue is required to prevent garbling. I had some luck with the pipe, but did see garbling which is somewhat expected. Implementing it turned out to be harder than I thought, particularly due to running on Windows, where there are some additional restrictions about global variables and stuff (see: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/765129/hows-python-multiprocessing-implemented-on-windows)

But, I finally got it working. This example probably isn't perfect, so comments and suggestions are welcome. It also does not support setting the formatter or anything other than the root logger. Basically, you have to reinit the logger in each of the pool processes with the queue and set up the other attributes on the logger.

Again, any suggestions on how to make the code better are welcome. I certainly don't know all the Python tricks yet :-)

import multiprocessing, logging, sys, re, os, StringIO, threading, time, Queue

class MultiProcessingLogHandler(logging.Handler):
    def __init__(self, handler, queue, child=False):
        logging.Handler.__init__(self)

        self._handler = handler
        self.queue = queue

        # we only want one of the loggers to be pulling from the queue.
        # If there is a way to do this without needing to be passed this
        # information, that would be great!
        if child == False:
            self.shutdown = False
            self.polltime = 1
            t = threading.Thread(target=self.receive)
            t.daemon = True
            t.start()

    def setFormatter(self, fmt):
        logging.Handler.setFormatter(self, fmt)
        self._handler.setFormatter(fmt)

    def receive(self):
        #print "receive on"
        while (self.shutdown == False) or (self.queue.empty() == False):
            # so we block for a short period of time so that we can
            # check for the shutdown cases.
            try:
                record = self.queue.get(True, self.polltime)
                self._handler.emit(record)
            except Queue.Empty, e:
                pass

    def send(self, s):
        # send just puts it in the queue for the server to retrieve
        self.queue.put(s)

    def _format_record(self, record):
        ei = record.exc_info
        if ei:
            dummy = self.format(record) # just to get traceback text into record.exc_text
            record.exc_info = None  # to avoid Unpickleable error

        return record

    def emit(self, record):
        try:
            s = self._format_record(record)
            self.send(s)
        except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
            raise
        except:
            self.handleError(record)

    def close(self):
        time.sleep(self.polltime+1) # give some time for messages to enter the queue.
        self.shutdown = True
        time.sleep(self.polltime+1) # give some time for the server to time out and see the shutdown

    def __del__(self):
        self.close() # hopefully this aids in orderly shutdown when things are going poorly.

def f(x):
    # just a logging command...
    logging.critical('function number: ' + str(x))
    # to make some calls take longer than others, so the output is "jumbled" as real MP programs are.
    time.sleep(x % 3)

def initPool(queue, level):
    """
    This causes the logging module to be initialized with the necessary info
    in pool threads to work correctly.
    """
    logging.getLogger('').addHandler(MultiProcessingLogHandler(logging.StreamHandler(), queue, child=True))
    logging.getLogger('').setLevel(level)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    stream = StringIO.StringIO()
    logQueue = multiprocessing.Queue(100)
    handler= MultiProcessingLogHandler(logging.StreamHandler(stream), logQueue)
    logging.getLogger('').addHandler(handler)
    logging.getLogg
    
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I wonder if if 'MainProcess' == multiprocessing.current_process().name: can be used in place of passing child? –  mlt Oct 2 '13 at 0:30
    
In case someone else is trying to use process pool instead of separate process objects on Windows, it worth mentioning that Manager shall be used to pass queue to subprocesses as it is not picklable directly. –  mlt Oct 2 '13 at 6:15
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I liked zzzeek's answer. I would just substitute the Pipe for a Queue since if multiple threads/processes use the same pipe end to generate log messages they will get garbled.

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I was having some issues with the handler, though it wasnt that messages were garbled, its just the whole thing would stop working. I changed Pipe to be Queue since that is more appropriate. However the errors I was getting weren't resolved by that - ultimately I added a try/except to the receive() method - very rarely, an attempt to log exceptions will fail and wind up being caught there. Once I added the try/except, it runs for weeks with no problem, and a standarderr file will grab about two errant exceptions per week. –  zzzeek Nov 24 '09 at 16:51
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Yet another alternative might be the various non-file-based logging handlers in the logging package:

  • SocketHandler
  • DatagramHandler
  • SyslogHandler

(and others)

This way, you could easily have a logging daemon somewhere that you could write to safely and would handle the results correctly. Eg a simple socket server that just unpickles the message and emits it to its own rotating file handler.

The syslog handler would take care of this for you too. Of course, you could use your own instance of syslog not the system one.

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One of the alternatives is to write the mutliprocessing logging to a known file and register an atexit handler to join on those processes read it back on stderr; however, you won't get a real-time flow to the output messages on stderr that way.

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is the approach you are proposing below identical to the one from your comment here stackoverflow.com/questions/641420/… –  1_CR Aug 6 '12 at 17:37
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just publish somewhere your instance of the logger. that way, the other modules and clients can use your API to get the logger without having to import multiprocessing.

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The problem with this is that the multiprocessing loggers appear unnamed, so you won't be able to decipher the message stream easily. Maybe it would be possible to name them after creation, which would make it more reasonable to look at. –  cdleary Mar 13 '09 at 4:45
    
well, publish one logger for each module, or better, export diferent closures that use the logger with the module name. the point is to let other modules use your API –  Javier Mar 13 '09 at 4:48
    
Definitely reasonable (and +1 from me!), but I would miss being able to just import logging; logging.basicConfig(level=logging.DEBUG); logging.debug('spam!') from anywhere and have it work properly. –  cdleary Mar 13 '09 at 5:07
3  
It's an interesting phenomenon that I see when I use Python, that we get so used to being able to do what we want in 1 or 2 simple lines that the simple and logical approach in other languages (eg. to publish the multiprocessing logger or wrap it in an accessor) still feels like a burden. :) –  Kylotan Mar 13 '09 at 12:00
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