Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to have some const global variables which I can use in the javascript and I came out with this code and picking up from some answers referred in SO. But it seems that I have a little mistake somewhere which I couldn't spot. Can someone help me with this?

in testQuery.js

(function (window, undefined) {

    var testQuery = function(obj) {
        if (!(this instanceof testQuery)) {
            return new testQuery(obj);
        }
    }

    var MYGLOBALS = function() {
        var globals = {
            foo : "bar",
            batz : "blah"           
        }

        return {
            getValue : function(s) {
                return globals[s];
            }
        }
    }();

    window.testQuery = testQuery;

}) (window);

and in the html javascript tag i have this line of code.

in testQuery.html file

<html>
  <head>
    <script src="testQuery.js"></script>
    <script>

       function onClick() {

             alert(MYGLOBALS.getValue("foo"));
       }

    </script>
  </head>

  <body>

      <input type="button" onclick="onClick()">

  </body>

</html>
share|improve this question
    
What makes you think you have a mistake? What error output/behaviour are you getting, and what did you expect? –  Andrzej Doyle Jun 20 '11 at 16:12
    
@Andrzej Doyle i am suppose to expect a pop up box that returns 'bar' from what i understand from the code. however, it seems that it is not responding to what i understand. –  simplified. Jun 20 '11 at 16:13
    
Part of the problem understanding it might have been that it was misleadingly (and inconsistently) indented. I've updated the indentation to be more standard, which may help (and will certainly help people reading the question). Edit: And now I've done it again (your edit wiped it out). –  T.J. Crowder Jun 20 '11 at 16:18
    
@T.J Crowder sorry about that, i was trying to add in the codes in the html file before i saw this comment. –  simplified. Jun 20 '11 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

The variable MYGLOBALS is local to your scoping function (the big outermost function that has no name), so it can only be accessed from within that function.

I'm not sure what you mean by "...in the html javascript tag..." but if the alert you've quoted is outside that scoping function, MYGLOBALS is out of scope for it.


Update: The thing about JavaScript scope is that it's much simpler than people think it is. Variables declared with var are private to the scope (function or global; JavaScript has no block-level scope so just {} doesn't do it) in which they're declared, and sub-scopes of that scope (e.g., functions declared or define within it). And scope is entirely lexical — that is, it is what you see in the source code, not dictated by some other runtime structure. They don't pop out of that scope unless you see code somewhere explicitly making that happen, as with your window.testQuery = testQuery; line, which explicitly makes testQuery a property on window and therefore a global variable. (And even then, it's not that the variable has popped out of the scope, just that you've created a new property referring to the same thing which is more broadly-accessible.)


Update 2: Re your comment

Actually what I am trying to do is to create something like what you would see when you are doing programming in other language where there will be a final static integer which you can put into the parameters fields on the functions you call. is there a better way of doing it? For example, in visual basic its something like me.background = Color.YELLOW. what I want is to have a static variable which will represent that YELLOW color.

JavaScript doesn't have user-defined constants, and doesn't have enums. (Update: Both of those things may change with ES6.) What you do instead is define an object with the properties, e.g.:

var COLORS = {
    RED: "#FF0000",
    BLUE: "#0000FF",
    // ...
    GREEN: "#00FF00"
};

Those aren't constants, there's nothing to keep anyone from assigning to COLORS.RED except your telling them not to.

(Update: In ES5, we can make those properties constant using Object.defineProperties, like this:

var COLORS = Object.defineProperties({}, {
    RED:   {value: "#FF0000"},
    BLUE:  {value: "#0000FF"},
    // ...
    GREEN: {value: "#00FF00"}
});

When you define a property that way, by default it's not writable.)

For what you're doing, you probably want the module pattern, where you have a single global symbol whose value is an object, and everything else is properties on that object:

(function() {
    var mod;

    // Create the global, and also give ourselves a convenient alias for it (`mod`)
    window.MyModule = mod = {};

    // Colors
    mod.COLORS = {
        RED: "#FF0000",
        BLUE: "#0000FF",
        // ...
        GREEN: "#00FF00"
    };

    mod.testQuery = MyModule_testQuery;
    function MyModule_testQuery() {
        // Do something
    }

})();

alert(MyModule.COLORS.RED); // #FF0000
MyModule.testQuery();       // Do something

Or if you prefer, that testQuery function could be defined like this:

    mod.testQuery = function() {
        // Do something
    };

...but then the function is anonymous, and I'm not a fan of anonymous functions. (Note that there's nothing special about the name MyModule_testQuery, that's purely my naming convention.)


Somewhat off topic:

Regarding this line where we're publishing our global symbol above:

// Create the global, and also give ourselves a convenient alias for it (`mod`)
window.MyModule = mod = {};

Note that that is very specific to browser environments. We could make it applicable to any JavaScript environment with a trivial change:

// Create the global, and also give ourselves a convenient alias for it (`mod`)
this.MyModule = mod = {};

That works because we're the ones who call the outermost scoping function, and so we know that we're not calling it with any particular this value (this in JavaScript — unlike some other languages — is determined entirely by how a function is called, not where or how it's defined). So since we know we're not using any special this value, we know that it will be the global object, because that's how JavaScript works. And the global object is window on web browsers (effectively; technically window is a property on the global object that refers back to itself).

share|improve this answer
    
@T.J. Crowder but doesn't this line window.testQuery = testQuery; makes this whole function accessible outside the scope? –  simplified. Jun 20 '11 at 16:16
    
@simplified: It makes the symbol window.testQuery accessible outside the function (makes testQuery a property on window, e.g. a global variable). It has no effect on MYGLOBALS at all. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 20 '11 at 16:19
    
@T.J Crowder does this means that i have to refer to testQuery to access myglobals? like testQuery.MYGLOBALS or something? –  simplified. Jun 20 '11 at 16:20
    
@simplified: You could do that, if you put MYGLOBALS on testQuery as a property. Then you could access them as window.testQuery.MYGLOBALS (or just testQuery.MYGLOBALS). –  T.J. Crowder Jun 20 '11 at 16:21
    
@T.J Crowder actually what I am trying to do is to create something like what you would see when you are doing programming in other language where there will be a final static integer which you can put into the parameters fields on the functions you call. is there a better way of doing it? For example, in visual basic its something like me.background = Color.YELLOW. what I want is to have a static variable which will represent that YELLOW color. –  simplified. Jun 20 '11 at 16:28

http://jsfiddle.net/vXu7m/1/

Some syntactic cleanup, and attaching you MYGLOBALS to the window object should do what you want.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.