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This is the code:

    import acm.program.*; 

    public class test extends GraphicsProgram{ 

        public test(){ 

           println(getHeight()); 

        } 

        public void run(){ 

          println(getHeight()); 

        } 

    }

The executed result is 0 472. Why does getHeight() in the constructor return 0, whereas run() returns 472, which is the real value?

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps height hasn't been set in the constructor when you print it. – Peter Lawrey Jun 20 '11 at 16:32
2  
This is not even a proper Java code snippet. And what is GraphicsProgram? – asgs Jun 20 '11 at 16:32
1  

The height has not been set until the init() method, which executes before the run() method.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I have to call getHeight() method without having run() method, e.g: the class test is used as a subclass, which not necessarily has a run() method; and main class is gonna create an object of this class test with getHeight() method actually functioning. – Robin Banner Jun 20 '11 at 17:04
    
Override the init() method of the subclass, making sure to call super.init() before trying to access the getHeight() method. – Marcelo Jun 20 '11 at 17:06
    
Bear with me but I failed again.. here is my code: 1)(class to be used)import acm.graphics.*; public class test extends GCanvas{ public int x; public void init(){ x = getHeight(); } } 2)(main executive class)import acm.program.*; public class test2 extends ConsoleProgram{ public void run(){ test a = new test(); a.init(); println(a.x); } } which still returns a zero.... – Robin Banner Jun 20 '11 at 17:53
    
You are extending a different class now, but basically where you have public void init(){ x = getHeight(); } call public void init(){ super.init(); x = getHeight(); } – Marcelo Jun 20 '11 at 18:00
    
Thanks for your answer, but this really drives me crazy... when i try to add the line super.init(); Eclipse says that init() is undefined for the type GCanvas.. so I change the GCanvas back to GraphicsProgram. The warning from Eclipse goes away, but when I run the program test2, getHeight() still returns a zero.. – Robin Banner Jun 20 '11 at 18:16

An item doesn't have a height at first. Most likely you are calling getHeight() before the component is laid out or given a height.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I have to call getHeight() method without having run() method, e.g: the class test is used as a subclass, which not necessarily has a run() method; and main class is gonna create an object of this class test with getHeight() method actually functioning. – Robin Banner Jun 20 '11 at 17:04
    
A subclass of test will always have a run method because test has a run method. Either way, something will need to set the height before you can access the value. – jzd Jun 20 '11 at 17:26
    
sorry for using the misleading word subclass .. bear with a starter .. what I really mean is another class, named main_class(with run method), which do not have the hierarchical relationship. The main_class is gonna create an object of the class test*(without run method). What to do if I want getHeight() in *test class take its function. – Robin Banner Jun 20 '11 at 18:04
    
Both examples are completely unrelated to the core problem. I don't think you understand what the code is actually doing. – jzd Jun 20 '11 at 19:29

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