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This is the code that I have:

positionMatrix = ([0]*1000, [0]*1000, [0]*1000)
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closed as not a real question by Justin Ethier, Seth Johnson, Lennart Regebro, Ken White, David Basarab Jun 21 '11 at 2:05

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
And the problem is? –  Cat Plus Plus Jun 20 '11 at 17:38
    
Do you actually want an array, or do you want a list of lists, or do you want a tuple of lists, or ... ? If you really want a matrix, use numpy. Also, 1000 x 3 is not a 3D matrix. –  Seth Johnson Jun 20 '11 at 17:57
    
Isn't 3 x 1000 a matrix. And I am using Python 3. I don't believe numpy is compatible with Python 3. –  kachilous Jun 20 '11 at 17:59
    
@Seth, and I really want a multi dimensional array. With 3 columns, each column having 1000 rows –  kachilous Jun 20 '11 at 18:01
    
@kachilous: numpy works with Python 3 since some time last year. –  Thomas K Jun 20 '11 at 18:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is still not really clear what you want.

If you want multidimensional array you can use lists:

>>> matrix = [[None]*10 for x in range(3)]#replace 10 with 1000 or what ever
>>> matrix
[[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None], [None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None], [None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None]]
>>>

Also I would recommend the use of None rather that 0.

You can acces the matrix like this:

>>> matrix[1][3] = 55
>>> matrix
[[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None], [None, None, None, 55, None, None, None, None, None, None], [None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None]]

Is this what you were aiming for?

For a better visual representation you could do something like:

>>> for x in matrix:
...     print(x, "\n")
... 
[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None] 

[None, None, None, 55, None, None, None, None, None, None] 

[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None] 

You could also go with:

>>> matrix = [[None]*10 for x in xrange(3)]

Read about it here.

Since you are using python 3x. you should use range(). Se more here.

Oh and by the way there is nothing particularly wrong with what you are doing, you are using a tuple instead of a list, these are not mutable, but the nested lists inside are, so you can modify it:

>>> positionMatrix = ([0]*10, [0]*10, [0]*10)
>>> positionMatrix
([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
>>> positionMatrix[0][4] = 99
>>> positionMatrix
([0, 0, 0, 0, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])

Just don't do this:

>>> positionMatrix = [[0]*10]*3
>>> positionMatrix[0][4] = 99
>>> positionMatrix
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]
>>> 

It refers to the same object in memory.

Just in case, you can use this:

>>> positionMatrix = [[0]*10, [0]*10, [0]*10]
>>> positionMatrix
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]
>>> positionMatrix[0][4] = 99
>>> positionMatrix
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]

Since you would be creating 3 different objects.

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This gives me a syntax error: for x in matrix: print x, "\n" –  kachilous Jun 20 '11 at 18:12
    
@kachilous: ohh sorry, forgot you were using python 3.x try print(x, "\n") –  Trufa Jun 20 '11 at 18:15
    
Perfect. Thanks so much. Also, what is the difference between matrix = [[None]*10 for x in xrange(3)] and matrix = [[None]*10 for x in range(3)] –  kachilous Jun 20 '11 at 18:26
    
@kachilous: My bad again. If you are using python 3.x you should use range() see this: docs.python.org/release/3.1.3/whatsnew/… –  Trufa Jun 20 '11 at 18:36
    
So I should always use the second: matrix = [[None]*10 for x in range(3)]? –  kachilous Jun 20 '11 at 18:41

If performance isn't critical, you can use dictionaries as multidimensional arrays in Python.

positionMatrix = {}
positionMatrix[ row, col ] = foo

To initialize it to 3 x 1000 zeros:

for col in range( 3 ):
    for row in range( 1000 ):
        positionMatrix[ row, col ] = 0.0

Or just

from collections import defaultdict
positionMatrix = defaultdict(float)

Which initializes each element to 0 when it's first accessed.

If you're after a high performance numeric matrix, check out numpy.

EDIT: Updated for 3 columns by 1000 rows rather than a 3D matrix.

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He is using python 3.x I think numpy isn't yet available for it. –  Trufa Jun 20 '11 at 18:17
    
Wikipedia says numpy 1.5+ supports Python 3. –  Russell Borogove Jun 20 '11 at 19:21
    
Thats true! sorry about that! My mistake!! –  Trufa Jun 20 '11 at 19:25

positionMatrix = [[[0 for x in range(1000)] for x in range(1000)] for x in range(1000)]

This is the same as int positionMatrix[1000][1000][1000] in C/C++.

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