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Trying to do something like this...

public class MiniObject
{
    public bool Checked { get; set; }
    public String Caption { get; set; }

    public ICollection<MiniObject> Content { get; set;}
}


<Window.Resources>
    <local:MiniObject x:Key="RootItem" Caption="Item0" Checked="True">
        <local:MiniObject.Content>
            <local:MiniObject Caption="Item1" Checked="True">
            </local:MiniObject>
            <local:MiniObject Caption="Item2" Checked="True">
            </local:MiniObject>
        </local:MiniObject.Content>
    </local:MiniObject>
</Window.Resources>

This of course doesn't work returning the error:

Object of type 'WorkflowTest.MiniObject' cannot be converted to type 'System.Collections.Generic.ICollection`1[WorkflowTest.MiniObject]'.

Is there a way to do this within WPF? If so do I need to change the shape of my objects at all or can I simply provide a specialized object that only WPF uses like...

<Window.Resources>
    <local:MiniObject x:Key="RootItem" Caption="Item0" Checked="True">
        <local:MiniObject.Content>
            <local:MiniObjectCollection>
                <local:MiniObject Caption="Item1" Checked="True">
                </local:MiniObject>
                <local:MiniObject Caption="Item2" Checked="True">
                </local:MiniObject>
            </local:MiniObjectCollection>
        </local:MiniObject.Content>
    </local:MiniObject>
</Window.Resources>
share|improve this question
    
Replacing public ICollection<MiniObject> Content { get; set;} with public List<MiniObject> Content { get; set;} Works but I need to avoid using an actual implementation. Using IList results in the same error. –  NtscCobalt Jun 20 '11 at 17:46
1  
how are you going to fill an collection with data if you don't use an actual implementation? –  John Gardner Jun 20 '11 at 18:41
    
@John Gardner The reason I chose ICollection is because MiniObject is used in an ORM and I'd prefer it to use only interfaces like IList or ICollection. The code I'm writing here is for the Design Time data and testing. I'd prefer not to write a separate class just to make the designer happy. –  NtscCobalt Jun 20 '11 at 23:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're trying to use XAML's implicit collection syntax. In order to do this, the property (Content, in this case) must be of a type that implements ICollection. Note: not ICollection, but a type that implements ICollection.

You can't just use an interface because the XamlReader needs to know what type of object to create. If you haven't told it the type, how should it decide? By searching through all of the types available to your assembly, finding the ones that implement ICollection<MiniObject>, discarding the ones that don't have a parameterless constructor, and then choosing one at random? No.

When you define Content as List<MiniObject>, the XamlReader knows what type of object it should create. Since that's a type that implements ICollection, it can use the implicit collection syntax. So it just creates the object and calls Add to add the child items, and if you stuck a child item in there that isn't a MiniObject you'll get a runtime error.

You say that "I need to avoid using an actual implementation" in your Content property. In that case, you cannot use the implicit collection syntax. You will need to do what you do in your second example: explicitly define a type that implements ICollection<MiniObject>, and add a child element in your XAML to create it explicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
From the MSDN, to declare a collection property in XAML, the collection type could be the one of IList, IDictionary and Array or implementing IAddChild, but your answer sounds as though ICollection is OK. –  Jin-Wook Chung Jun 20 '11 at 19:23
    
Ah ok I think I understand and that makes sense that it wouldn't know what type of ICollection to implement. Now I just need to figure out how to do what I explained in the 2nd example. Thank you. –  NtscCobalt Jun 20 '11 at 23:51

With only your code mentioned above, it will be thrown as the null reference exception to write a collection property in XAML due to the fact from the MSDN:

The presence of that collection type is implicit whenever you specify a property 
in XAML that takes a collection type.

So, I suggest initializing the collection in XAML as the following, if you do not want to have the collection instance in the class declaration.

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:system="clr-namespace:System.Collections;assembly=mscorlib"  xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1"  Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Window.Resources>
        <local:MiniObject x:Key="RootItem" Caption="Item0" Checked="True">
            <local:MiniObject.Content>
                <system:ArrayList>  -------------------------------------1)
                    <local:MiniObject Caption="Item1" Checked="True">
                    </local:MiniObject>
                    <local:MiniObject Caption="Item2" Checked="True">
                    </local:MiniObject>
                </system:ArrayList>
            </local:MiniObject.Content>
        </local:MiniObject>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid>
        <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource ResourceKey=RootItem}, Path=Content}" DisplayMemberPath="Caption"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>


public class MiniObject
{
    public bool Checked { get; set; }
    public String Caption { get; set; }

    public IList Content { get; set; } -----------------------------------------2)
}

At the 2), you may know there are the four alternatives(IList,IDictionary, etc.) to be the collection property in XAML. Please, refer to the MSDN. Above, ICollection is also OK, as the items are added to the ArrayList.

At the 1), We cannot declare a generic type collection yet, but I know it would be supported as soon.

share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting and good to know. I'm not voting it as the answer mostly because it doesn't fit my current implementation where I need a collection of known types (I access some variables of the object in the UI in a Tree View). I think this will be a useful feature when Generic Type Collections are implemented but at the moment I think it would be more confusing than simply requiring a wrapper for the design time / window.resources instantiation. –  NtscCobalt Jun 20 '11 at 23:58

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