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#include <iostream>  
using namespace std;  
#include <exception>  

void dis()
{
    cout<<"terminate disabled "<< endl;
}

void display() throw(int,double)    
{
    if(0)  
        throw int();  
    if(0)  
        throw double();  
    if(1)  
        throw string();  
}  

int main()  
{     
    set_unexpected(dis);  
    try  
    {  
        display();      
    }  
    catch(int)  
    {
        cout<<"int "<< endl;
    }  
    catch(double)  
    {
        cout<<"double "<< endl;
    }  
    catch(string)  
    {
        cout<<"string "<< endl;
    }  

    system("pause");  
    return 0;  
}      

now the output was

terminate disabled

and then the program terminated

but instead of set_unexpected when i wrote

set_terminate(dis);

the output was

terminate disabled  
terminate disabled 

why this dicrepancy?

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You should not include headers below a using namespace std; statement. –  rubenvb Jun 20 '11 at 19:07
    
@als it is Mingw port of GCC as given on the internet –  avinash Jun 20 '11 at 19:14
    
I'd rather get rid of the exception specifications than figure them out. Exception specifications can be difficult to get and keep right, work really badly with templates, and complicate the type system, among other things. –  David Thornley Jun 20 '11 at 19:31

1 Answer 1

So, it's not entirely clear what your original output was. I tried to clean it up as best as I could, but your quote tags make it unobvious.

In your code, if you use set_unexpected(dis), you should see:

terminate disabled

In your code if you use set_terminate(dis), you should see:

terminate disabled

In your code, if you use both set_unexpected(dis) and set_terminate(dis), you should see:

terminate disabled
terminate disabled

One way to get around this, is to have dis throw 0 as the last line. That would allow you to convert your exception to something that your function claims that it will throw.

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I don't understand, in his code, displa() throw string(), and in his main(), string exception is caught, isn't it? why is dis triggered? –  Alcott Sep 17 '11 at 3:20
    
@Alcott: He uses an exception specifier. Because of this, the function should only return the types specified there. –  Bill Lynch Sep 18 '11 at 14:06

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