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I'm trying to come up with a non brute-force solution to the following problem. Given a matrix of arbitrary size:

[6  0  3  5]
[3  7  1  4]
[1  4  8  2]
[0  2  5  9]

Transform its diagonals to a list of vectors, like so:

(0)
(1, 2)
(3, 4, 5)
(6, 7, 8, 9)
(0, 1, 2)
(3, 4)
(5)

(Working from bottom left to top right in this example)

Is there an elegant way to do this short of iterating up the left column and across the top row?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would just write a little function to transform the vector indices into matrix indices.

Say the matrix is NxN square, then there will be 2N-1 vectors; if we number the vectors from 0 to 2N-2, element k of vector n will be at row max(N-1-n+k,k) and column max(n+k-N+1,k) (or in reverse, the matrix element at row i, column j will be element min(i,j) of vector N-1+j-i). Then whenever you need to access an element of a vector, just convert the coordinates from k,n to i,j (that is, convert vector indices to matrix indices) and access the appropriate element of the matrix. Instead of actually having a list of vectors, you'll wind up with something that emulates a list of vectors, in the sense that it can give you any desired element of any vector in the list - which is really just as good. (Welcome to duck typing ;-)

If you're going to access every element of the matrix, though, it might just be quicker to iterate, rather than doing this computation every time.

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(non-checked code) Something like this (java code):

// suppose m is the matrix, so basically an int[][] array with r rows and c columns
// m is an int[rows][cols];

List result = new ArrayList(rows + cols - 1);
for (int i = 0; i < (rows + cols - 1))
{
  int y;
  int x;
  if (i < rows)
  {
    x = 0;
    y = rows - i - 1;
  }
  else
  {
    x = i - rows + 1;
    y = 0;
  }
  Vector v = new Vector();
  while (y < rows && x < cols)
  {
    y++;
    x++;
    v.add(new Integer(m[y][c]));
  }
  result.add(v);
}
// result now contains the vectors you wanted

Edit: i had x and y mixed up, corrected now.

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Suggestion: use ArrayList again instead of the Vector inside the loop. (Also, this could be updated to modern Java using generics and autoboxing) –  David Z Mar 13 '09 at 7:22
    
@David: i would use ArrayLists, but the orig post was talking about Vectors :) and (still) not everyone uses java 1.5+ –  tehvan Mar 13 '09 at 13:00

Mathematica:

m = {{6, 0, 3, 5}, 
     {3, 7, 1, 4}, 
     {1, 4, 8, 2}, 
     {0, 2, 5, 9}};

Table[Diagonal[m, i], {i, 1 - Length@m, Length@m[[1]] - 1}]

Which gives a list of the i'th diagonals where the 0th diagonal is the main diagonal, i = -1 gives the one below it, etc. In other words, it returns:

{{0}, {1, 2}, {3, 4, 5}, {6, 7, 8, 9}, {0, 1, 2}, {3, 4}, {5}}

Of course using the built-in Diagonal function is kind of cheating. Here's an implementation of Diagonal from scratch:

(* Grab the diagonal starting from element (i,j). *)
diag0[m_,i_,j_] := Table[m[[i+k, j+k]], {k, 0, Min[Length[m]-i, Length@m[[1]]-j]}]

(* The i'th diagonal -- negative means below the main diagonal, positive above. *)
Diagonal[m_, i_] := If[i < 0, diag0[m, 1-i, 1], diag0[m, 1, i+1]]

The Table function is basically a for loop that collects into a list. For example,

Table[2*i, {i, 1, 5}]

returns {2,4,6,8,10}.

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