Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using the C++ boost asio library, where I listen to new connections on the socket. On getting a connection I process the request and then listen for a new connection on another socket in a loop.

while (true)
{
    tcp::socket soc(this->blitzIOService);
    this->blitzAcceptor.listen();
    boost::system::error_code ec;
    this->blitzAcceptor.accept(soc,ec);
    if (ec)
    {
        // Some error occured
        cerr << "Error Value: " << ec.value() << endl;
        cerr << "Error Message: " << ec.message() << endl;
        soc.close();
        break;
    }
    else
    {
        this->HandleRequest(soc);
        soc.shutdown(tcp::socket::shutdown_both);
        soc.close();
    }
}

According to my understanding it should always block at this->blitzAcceptor.accept(soc,ec); and everytime a new connection is made it should handle it in this->HandleRequest(soc); and again block at this->blitzAcceptor.accept(soc,ec);

But what I see is this that for the first time it will block at this->blitzAcceptor.accept(soc,ec) and when a new connection is made it will handle the request, but instead of blocking again at this->blitzAcceptor.accept(soc,ec) it will go ahead into this->HandleRequest(soc); and block at soc.receive(); inside.

This doesn't happen always, but happens most of the time. What could be the reason to this behavior, and how can I ensure that it always block at this->blitzAcceptor.accept(soc,ec) until a new request is made?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What could be the reason to this behavior?

This behavior is entirely dependent on the client code. If it connects, but does not send a request, the server with block when receiving data.

how can I ensure that it always block at this->blitzAcceptor.accept(soc,ec) until a new request is made?

You can't. But your server can initiate a timeout that starts immediately after accepting the connection. If the client does not send a request within that duration, close the socket. To do that, you should switch to using asynchronous methods rather than synchronous methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Your explanation "This behavior is entirely dependent on the client code. If it connects, but does not send a request, the server with block when receiving data." is correct. I am writing a Http Server and was under the impression that the browser will make a new connection only when it makes a new request. Here I noticed that it does make a new new connection, without having any request to send. As of now I serve the request and close the connection. Maybe for this reason it makes a new connection just as an optimization. –  Satya Sidhu Jun 22 '11 at 4:20

Be sure you're not blocking on a read(2) call for the file descriptor that you are listen(2)'ing on vs the file descriptor that you accept(2)'ed. I think if you print out the file descriptor numbers you'll very quickly find your problem.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.