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I am trying to write some codes which allow me to retrieve integer values based on the variable name i use. however, i am trying to make the integer values a final value or something which can't be changed. i have placed some codes below which allows me to retrieve values as explain above. can anyone tell me how issit possible for me to make them a final variable or something? Thanks in advance.

(function() {

// Create the global, and also give ourselves a convenient alias for it (`mod`)
 window.MyModule = {
    RED: "#FF0000",
    BLUE: "#0000FF",
    GREEN: "#00FF00",
};

})();

alert(MyModule.RED); // #FF0000
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3 Answers 3

Disclaimer: In terms of security constant / final variables are silly. In terms of increased performance because the js engine can optimise it more I doubt it makes a difference.

Benchmark shows no noticable increase in performance. This isn't actually useful apart from pedantry or pseudo security.

The only use case is making part of your library frozen so that users don't shoot themself in the foot.

With ES5 Object.freeze

window.MyModule = Object.freeze({
    RED: "#FF0000",
    BLUE: "#0000FF",
    GREEN: "#00FF00",
});

You can (and it's highly recommended) use the ES5-shim to upgrade older/legacy browsers for compliance.

You can also just use Object.defineProperties

window.MyModule = {};
Object.defineProperties(window.MyModule, {
  RED: { value: "#FF0000" },
  BLUE: { value: "#0000FF" },
  GREEN: { value: "#00FF00" }
});

There is a nice shortcut for the above using Object.create

window.MyModule = Object.create(null, {
  RED: { value: "#FF0000" },
  BLUE: { value: "#0000FF" },
  GREEN: { value: "#00FF00" }
});

Be wary that sets the prototype to null, you may want to set it to Object.prototype

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thanks for your reply. but i was wondering if there's a way of doing it such that it can rely on the older javascript versions where ES5-shim will not be required? Are the rest below, usable for older versions of browsers? –  simplified. Jun 20 '11 at 20:23
    
@simplified nothing that's safe. You can't have constant / final or read only properties in ES3 across all browsers. ES5-shim works on FF2/3 & opera10 & safari 4. Not on IE6/7/8 –  Raynos Jun 20 '11 at 20:24
    
@Raynos Why aren't constant variables useful in terms of security? –  Anderson Green Oct 22 '12 at 19:30

The best/only way I know to do this is to declare RED, BLUE, GREEN, etc. as functions and return a constant value, like so:

window.MyModule = {
    RED: function() { return "#FF0000"; },
    BLUE: function() { return "#0000FF"; },
    GREEN: function() { return "#00FF00"; }
};

Someone can still overwrite the function to do something different, but it's semantically more difficult to do - a function seems more so like it shouldn't be overwritten.

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And then I do window.MyModule.RED = function() { return "#00FF00"; };. Final or constant don't exist (yet) in javscript. Wait for ES5. –  Jan Jun 20 '11 at 20:10
    
thanks for your replies, but i tried modifying my code to change the values into functions but, when i call an alert, it returns me the whole string in the sense that in the alert box it shows function() { return "#FF0000"; }. why is this so? –  simplified. Jun 20 '11 at 20:14
    
@simplified because you have to alert window.MyModule.RED() –  Raynos Jun 20 '11 at 20:15
    
Did you call the function or just pass the function to alert? If you choose to use functions, then you should call the function, like so: alert(MyModule.RED()); –  FishBasketGordo Jun 20 '11 at 20:17
    
@FishBasketGordo i think i missed out that bracket. but i am trying to get something which i can just call like MyModule.RED, like calling for a variable. is it possible instead? –  simplified. Jun 20 '11 at 20:21

You can create a read-only property (i.e. one that has a getter but no setter).

If using ECMAScript5 check out Object.defineProperty().

Some earlier versions support object.__defineGetter__().

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Preferably use the ES5-shim which will feature detect for Object.__defineGetter__ rather then using it directly. –  Raynos Jun 20 '11 at 20:25

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